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Intermittent fasting, carbohydrates and more

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Crowan
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(@crowan)
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I'm a huge believer in intermittent fasting due to the way it allows me to control my insulin levels. I've lost a lot of body fat from doing it and feel much better generally. We did evolve as hunter gatherers, so our bodies aren't meant to be eating big sugary carb filled breakfasts in my opinion. Given your area of study, I'd love to know your thoughts on it.

Hello MassagePeople! And welcome πŸ™‚
There are several ways of fasting, like eating nothing for periods of time or just taking juices or certain types of food. If the insulin levels are your concern, then I would say that if you're thinking of juice fasting then try not to eliminate the fibre from the juice, which is so beneficial and would make your blood sugar not to spike. I agree with the idea of not having high sugary carbs, not only in breakfast but also in the rest of your meals, whatever they are. It's always much better to go for the long-chain carbohydrates because the release of the energy is more constant in time and you don't have spikes. Examples: starches like potatoes, wheat, rice, etc.
You can also substitute highly refined sugars for natural sources, like fruit (dates, raisins, carrots, ...).
When doing the fasting, you may have experienced things like increased energy, mental clarity, clear and glowing skin, brighter eyes, even more productive!
Fasting provides a lot of benefits when doing it right. Although we may try to eat as healthy and clean as possible, your body is always detoxifying, not only from food but also from other environmental sources, like cosmetic, air, water, etc. So, doing fasting from time to time is good.

I hope this information helped you πŸ™‚

I was interested in this, since I also find intermittent fasting helpful. I don’t use juice because of the carbohydrates, but I fast on bone broth a couple of times a week. MassagePeople, what do you fast on, how often and for how long?

Nourishingyouwell, I tend not to eat starchy carbs. I assume, since you are recommending them, that you would disagree? Can you direct me to any scientific studies that back this up, since all the ones I have read suggest they are neither necessary nor particularly advisable.

Thanks.

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(@nourishingyouwell)
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I am fascinated by this comment. There is a lot of evidence that ginger is good for hyperemesis gravidarum. I once investigated to see if the hospital where I worked could actually obtain ginger capsules. What is the risk ? Because having worked in Obstetrics I thought I knew most of the risky 'natural' remedies and ginger never once appeared on my horizon .

Hi Tashanie, I think I didn't explain that properly.
As far as I know yes, ginger is good for morning sickness in pregnants, which happens in early stages of pregnancy. But, when a woman is in the oldest days it is not recommended because it might cause more bleeding in labour.
So, I've been told by my teachers in nutrition that, over the past weeks of pregnancy, better not to take those things like turmeric, ginger, ginkgo, etc., which vasodilate and, in labour, won't help.

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Posts: 13
(@nourishingyouwell)
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Joined: 7 years ago

In general terms. What, in you opinion, would cause that. Generally, it's a reaction to something eaten, is it not?

Hi Crowan,
I'm not saying you have chronic inflammation but triggers of it are: an irritant which is eaten and persist in the body (normally something you eat and you don't know you have a sensitivity to it), autoimmune conditions (your immune system attackts itself), or failure to remove what is causing th e inflammation. How to know that you are inflammed? You experience pain, heat, swelling...

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Crowan
Posts: 3429
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(@crowan)
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Hi Crowan,
I'm not saying you have chronic inflammation but triggers of it are: an irritant which is eaten and persist in the body (normally something you eat and you don't know you have a sensitivity to it), autoimmune conditions (your immune system attackts itself), or failure to remove what is causing th e inflammation. How to know that you are inflammed? You experience pain, heat, swelling...

So, not that then. I'll stick to keto and fasting.

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