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Khora ..


NICE_1
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Another word came to mind an hour or so ago was Khora ..

Never heard of it ..
(as always) lol .. but after a little research I found it most interesting as I am Interested in all states of mind ..

I don't suppose there is much scope in conversation with the text I have copied below but I thought it was interesting enough to share ..

Perhaps others have experienced a similar state to which Khora has been defined .

Khôra (Khora or Chora; Ancient Greek: χώρα) is a philosophical term described by Plato in Timaeus as a receptacle, a space, or an interval. It is neither being nor nonbeing but an interval between in which the "forms" were originally held. Khôra "gives space" and has maternal overtones (a womb, matrix).

Key authors addressing "khôra" include Heidegger who refers to a "clearing" in which being happens or takes place (Nader El-Bizri, 2001, 2004). Julia Kristeva deploys the term as part of her analysis of the difference between the semiotic and symbolic realms, in that Plato's concept of "khora" is said to anticipate the emancipatory employment of semiotic activity as a way of evading the allegedly phallocentric character of symbolic activity (signification through language), which, following Jacques Lacan, is regarded as an inherently limiting and oppressive form of praxis.

Julia Kristeva articulates the 'chora' in terms of a presignifying state: 'Although the chora can be designated and regulated, it can never be definively posited: as a result, one can situate the chora and, if necessary, lend it a topology, but one can never give it axiomatic form.' Jacques Derrida uses "khôra" to name a radical otherness that "gives place" for being. Derrida argues that the subjectile is like Plato’s chora, Greek for space, receptacle or site. Plato proposes that the chora rests between the sensible and the intelligible, through which everything passes but in which nothing is retained. For example an image needs to be held by something, just as a mirror will hold a reflection. For Derrida, "khôra" defies attempts at naming or either/or logic which he attempts to "deconstruct" (see deconstruction). See also Derrida's collaborative project with Architect Peter Eisenmann, in Chora L Works:

Jacques Derrida and Peter Eisenman The project proposed the construction of a garden in the Parc de la Villette in Paris, which included a seive, or harp-like structure that Derrida invisaged as a physical metaphor for the receptacle-like properties of the chora. The concept of the chora, distinguished by its elusive properties, would have become a physical reality had the project been realised.
Following Derrida, John Caputo describes khôra as:

neither present nor absent, active or passive, the good nor evil, living nor nonliving - but rather atheological and nonhuman - khôra is not even a receptacle. Khôra has no meaning or essence, no identity to fall back upon. She/it receives all without becoming anything, which is why she/it can become the subject of neither a philosopheme nor mytheme. In short, the khôra is tout autre [fully other], very

x dazzle x

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WildStrawberry
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As I've said before I don't read anymore, or fill my head with other peoples ideas, might be a more accurate way to put it. But, from what I've vaguely heard/gathered - aren't they talking about either the Tao or The Void?

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NICE_1
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from what I've vaguely heard/gathered - aren't they talking about either the Tao or The Void?

I know what you mean W.S. I couldn't put my finger on exactly what they were referring to and yet whilst they all had different views on khora what they all said can be fitted together somehow .

x daz x

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Energylz
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Key authors addressing "khôra" include Heidegger who refers to a "clearing" in which being happens or takes place (Nader El-Bizri, 2001, 2004). Julia Kristeva deploys the term as part of her analysis of the difference between the semiotic and symbolic realms, in that Plato's concept of "khora" is said to anticipate the emancipatory employment of semiotic activity as a way of evading the allegedly phallocentric character of symbolic activity (signification through language), which, following Jacques Lacan, is regarded as an inherently limiting and oppressive form of praxis.

Yeah, obviously... :dft005: ... couldn't have put it better myself.

Khôra (Khora or Chora; Ancient Greek: χώρα) is a philosophical term described by Plato in Timaeus as a receptacle, a space, or an interval. It is neither being nor nonbeing but an interval between in which the "forms" were originally held. Khôra "gives space" and has maternal overtones (a womb, matrix).

Jacques Derrida uses "khôra" to name a radical otherness that "gives place" for being. Derrida argues that the subjectile is like Plato’s chora, Greek for space, receptacle or site. Plato proposes that the chora rests between the sensible and the intelligible, through which everything passes but in which nothing is retained. For example an image needs to be held by something, just as a mirror will hold a reflection. For Derrida, "khôra" defies attempts at naming or either/or logic which he attempts to "deconstruct" (see deconstruction). See also Derrida's collaborative project with Architect Peter Eisenmann, in Chora L Works:

Sounding similar to the principles I've heard talked about for meditation, where the "aim" (to use that loosely) is to "find" (again using that term loosely) the space in-between thoughts. The space between thoughts is meant to be where the present moment and the true self can be found/connected with. (my explanation is not completely clear because there's no really clear way of explaining it)

neither present nor absent, active or passive, the good nor evil, living nor nonliving - but rather atheological and nonhuman - khôra is not even a receptacle. Khôra has no meaning or essence, no identity to fall back upon. She/it receives all without becoming anything, which is why she/it can become the subject of neither a philosopheme nor mytheme. In short, the khôra is tout autre [fully other]

Yep, sounds like the same sort of thing. Never knew a name for it before though.

All Love and Reiki Hugs

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WildStrawberry
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Yeah, obviously... :dft005: ... couldn't have put it better myself.

😀 My thoughts exactly!

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