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Quorn


CrystalCat
Posts: 205
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(@crystalcat)
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Joined: 14 years ago

Hi all. My question is, is Quorn a good meat alternative nutritionally? A friend of mine has recently had the York test done and the nutritionalist she spoke to said that Quorn products really are not a good substitute at all and people are much mislead by it. Is it healthy to eat or not? I know it is high protein, low fat etc., I know it is 'grown', but am beginning to wonder what impact it may actually have on me healthwise, and my insides too, (having recently had a very nasty experience with gastritis (not saying that was the cause at all, I still don;t know what was)). I do like Quorn; find that it is very easy to prepare when come home from work with a plate of veg and it also means me eating earlier rather than later...Any advice greatly appreciated, esp. from CarolineN - who is just fantastic 🙂 (not ruling others out either :D). With very many thanks for your time.

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Energylz
Posts: 16599
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Joined: 18 years ago

Well, Quorn is a mycoprotein, so it's 'grown' as you say as a type of mushroom culture. Also, as you say it's low in fat and high in protein, so that's good from a health perspective.
In terms of other nutrients,

As with many things people can be intolerant to it, they even say so on their website...

but as they also point out, such fungi are also used in the production of other things such as breads and beer etc.

[url]Facts and Information about Quorn as Part of a Healthy Diet[/url]

In terms of other nutritional values for it, there's generally not much in there e.g. if you look at their mince product:

[url]Vegetarian Mince from Quorn - Healthy, Low Fat Alternatives[/url]

you're mainly looking at protein, carbs and fibre. Of course their other products have different added ingredients depending on exactly what you're buying, but if you're looking for vitamins and minerals, then you're not likely to find much in it because of what it is.

However it does make a good meat substitute and is good at soaking up flavours (unlike tofu 😀 ) and we often use quorn pieces in home made stir fries and suchlike.

I've heard some people say that it's 'not good for you', but nobody's actually backed up those statement with actual evidence of what they mean or why they've said that.

I'll certainly await Caroline's take on it. 😉

All Love and Reiki Hugs

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CarolineN
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(@carolinen)
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Hi Crystal Cat

Giles has covered a lot of the info on quorn. I think it depends on your perspective as to whether it's 'good' or not. If you have been a meat-eater and wish to become vegetarian then it is a nice easy step in that direction as it provides a high-protein, low-fat alternative without having to radically alter the diet. It is probably best to make your own meals using it as a meat substitute rather than buying ready-meals as you know what you have put into the meal. Food companies are more than likely to use short-cuts to reduce their costs - not to the benefit of the consumer.

It is more limited in micro-nutrients too, being a manufactured product - looking at McCance and Widdowson (FSA), but it is fairly high in sodium compared with beef, lower in potassium, higher in calcium and magnesium, similar phosphorus, less iron, and virtually no selenium or iodine. It is also low in most vitamins. So some benefits and some not.

Some people will object to it not being a 'natural' product - but as Giles pointed out, it is similar to beer and bread in that yeast is used to change the original product. The choice is yours.

I found it useful until I realised the egg content was detrimental to me. So it pays to look carefully at the labels and make sure there is nothing that might upset you. People don't realise that being vegetarian makes it quite difficult to make sure you get all the essential amino acids daily, let alone adequate amounts from what many consider a 'veggie' diet. Quinoa is one of the few plant foods that contains them all.

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VeggieR
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(@veggier)
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Joined: 9 years ago

I think Quorn is a good alternative, it is the same as anything in food, too much of something may not necessarily be good for you - this can go for fruit for e.g. with a lot being high in sugar. Quorn is great for those who still want to have similar meals, such as Bolognese, burgers, stir fry.. and also get protein into their meals as Quorn is full of it.

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Cascara
Posts: 980
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Wish I could use Quorn as it would make life as a veggie much easier but nearly all that I have seen contain gluten or wheat!

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Crowan
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… am beginning to wonder what impact it may actually have on me healthwise, and my insides too, (having recently had a very nasty experience with gastritis (not saying that was the cause at all, I still don;t know what was.


Among those who do have an intolerance to Quorn, abdominal upsets, indigestion and flatulence seem to be the most common symptoms.

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VeggieR
Posts: 5
(@veggier)
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Joined: 9 years ago

Wish I could use Quorn as it would make life as a veggie much easier but nearly all that I have seen contain gluten or wheat!

Have you used Paneer as a substitute? It's a cheese but you can fry it and it will still retain it's shape and is similar to tofu, but can be seasoned and very tasty.

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