Would this be the b...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Would this be the best kind of massage for me?

24 Posts
8 Users
0 Reactions
3,921 Views
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

I'm a full time carer and have got out of condition, e.g. slight oedema (around ankles), high blood pressure and am fairly obese now - around 15 stone. I'm 63.

Am I too fat to be able to benefit from a lymphatic massage, i.e. will the layer of fat make massaging my lymph glands problematic? I feel I need to boost my immune system, get some kind of vitality returned. I think this is the right massage if I'm not
too obese for it. Does it require being naked? Oils? (Both of which don't appeal).

I once had a shiatsu massage which did wonders in aligning my energy level. I guess
this doesn't boost the immune system though? Would this be a better option, given
my condition? If so, again, would I have to be naked and are oils used?

23 Replies
Reiki Pixie
Posts: 2380
(@reiki-pixie)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago

Hi Amy

Best person on here to ask about lymphatic massage is Jabba the Hut.

All forms of massage will stimulate the lymphatics to a lesser or greater degree.

Shiatsu may be based on an energy paradigm, but it is still works on the physical and immune system. The symptoms you quote could be helped by shiatsu, probably imbalance in the Spleen and Kidney energy systems. And you don't have to take your kit off ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

Hope that helps.

RP

Reply
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Thanks for this info. ๐Ÿ™‚

Reply
Posts: 4258
(@jabba-the-hut)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago

Here I am!!!!!

Lymphatic drainage can benefit everyone, regardless of shape, size or age. My client range is babies to a 98 year old, from a 5lb baby, to a hulky 35 stone chap who has very ticklish feet!!!

You don't have to be naked, but down to underwear is preferable - I encourage my ladies to discard their bras for treatment, as tight bras can impede lymph movement over the chest . We are all good at 'draping' so nothing is exposed that doesn't need to be. I don't use oil, but do make sure that my hands are moisturized. An MLD practitioner aims to move the skin, not slide over it, to encourage the superficial lymphatics to drain into the deeper vessels and stimulate the whole system.

It is a fantastically relaxing technique, and quite stimulating at the same time, as it encourages elimination - so you will end up have a few visits to the loo. To find a practitioner, there is a list at [url]Home - MLD UK[/url]

And, as RP says, shiatsu is good and Bowen and reiki and MFR and acupressure......... I could go on, but do give MLD a try!

Reply
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Jabba - thanks so much. That's exactly what I needed to know. I do actually have a local place that does it.

Reply
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Important info re. High blood pressure & massage

I went to make an appointment today for lymphatic drainage massage and, more as an afterthought, enquired about whether it would affect my having high blood pressure. (I was concerned about feeling whoozy afterwards as I once was with acupuncture). I'm glad I asked! I learnt that massage is not advisable for those who have high blood pressure.

Just to be sure I googled search and found lots of confirmation on this - here is one such source

[url]Hypertension: Massage Indication or Contraindication? | Institute for Integrative Healthcare Studies[/url]

Reply
Posts: 4258
(@jabba-the-hut)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago

Amy I just sent a PM.

If you read the whole of the article that you posted, you would see that it goes on to explain how massage can be beneficial for HPB.

MLD, done properly, can help to stabilise and reduce blood pressure. Make sure that the MLD therapist is adequately trained - the technique should not be compared to deep tissue massage which might antagonise blood pressure. Are you on meds for the HPB? Any therapist would take your presenting conditions into consideration and then treat accordingly.

Reply
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Amy I just sent a PM.

If you read the whole of the article that you posted, you would see that it goes on to explain how massage can be beneficial for HPB.

MLD, done properly, can help to stabilise and reduce blood pressure. Make sure that the MLD therapist is adequately trained - the technique should not be compared to deep tissue massage which might antagonise blood pressure. Are you on meds for the HPB? Any therapist would take your presenting conditions into consideration and then treat accordingly.

Well I did read the article I posted up to the 'rupturing of blood vessels!'...:eek: Kind of put me off right there. That it is problematic is enough for me not to go ahead. It's supposed to be relaxing .... I'd be far too worried. Yes I am on medication for HPB.

Before I made the appointment, I was given some info describing the massage procedure which made no mention of any contraindications, i.e. I only found out by asking! This concerns me and I would like to do something about it (by way of warning others). I don't feel it should be left for me to attend a session before I was told the relevant information, do you? Do you have any suggestions on how best to proceed with addressing this matter?

There were 3 manual lymphatic drainage practitioners at this health clinic - all with manual lymphatic drainage diplomas (ranging from 2001, 2002 and 2008).

Reply
CarolineN
Posts: 4760
(@carolinen)
Famed Member
Joined: 15 years ago

Hi Amy

When I had a series of MLD treatments it was very gentle indeed - much lighter than shiatsu even. There is no way it could cause ruptured blood vessels - in fact I was concrned it was not enough pressure! I was told it is beneficial for those with oedema to help with drainage of the lymphatic vessels which lie close under the skin.

All this is a long way from deep tissue massage where it might be possible to cause problems if done by someone who is unaware of the consequences of their actions on someone with HBP.

Reply
Posts: 861
(@mountaineer)
Prominent Member
Joined: 13 years ago

Sorry to hear of your problems, Amy. Seeing things in a different light. Poor thing, you must be stressed out.

I hope the MLD helps you.

Reply
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Hi Amy

When I had a series of MLD treatments it was very gentle indeed - much lighter than shiatsu even. There is no way it could cause ruptured blood vessels - in fact I was concrned it was not enough pressure! I was told it is beneficial for those with oedema to help with drainage of the lymphatic vessels which lie close under the skin.

All this is a long way from deep tissue massage where it might be possible to cause problems if done by someone who is unaware of the consequences of their actions on someone with HBP.

Whilst I understand what you say here, I cannot ignore that HBP is cited as being a contraindication to massage on so many sites as to be sufficiently concerning. This
cannot be brushed aside or overlooked I feel.

Reply
CarolineN
Posts: 4760
(@carolinen)
Famed Member
Joined: 15 years ago

Whilst I understand what you say here, I cannot ignore that HBP is cited as being a contraindication to massage on so many sites as to be sufficiently concerning. This
cannot be brushed aside or overlooked I feel.

I have to disagree with MLD. I wouldn't even call it massage - it's more like effleurage.

Reply
Posts: 4258
(@jabba-the-hut)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago

I have to disagree with MLD. I wouldn't even call it massage - it's more like effleurage.

Absolutely agree with your disagree, Caroline! And, whilst some forms of MLD are like effleurage, Vodder MLD is not. It is an incredibly light technique which when applied moves the skin - not the muscle, so there is virtually no stimulation of the underlying vascular or arterial system.

If lymph drainage massage is 'deep' or causes reddening of the skin, then it ain't MLD!!!

A register of MLD practitioners can be found on [url]Home - MLD UK[/url] - any questions, call their office, the number is on the site.

Reply
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Further investigation (from various sites) has yielded the information that, for those
who have chronic high blood pressure, it is advisable to contact their GP when
considering MLD. Would you disagree with this too?

Reply
Jinx
Posts: 291
 Jinx
(@jinx)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago

Hi Amy

Most therapists seeing a new client would begin by taking a brief medical history to identify what sort of massage the client is looking for and prompt for any conditions which could mean massage is contraindicated.

I don't do many treatment these days but back in the 90s when I trained we were taught if a client arrived with chronic high blood pressure or a number of other conditions then we should make sure they checked with their GP if it was ok they had massage. In 15 years I had many clients with chronic high blood pressure who enjoyed regular massage (some even found it helped) and never once had a GP say their patient shouldn't go ahead. Usually GPs are positive as, these days, most are aware of the benefits and there is a lot of clinical evidence supporting massage for conditions such as high blood pressure.

Only had MLD once but have to agree with Jabba and Caroline that it was so gentle I'm not sure it's really massage (I fell asleep!) but certainly it's worth a chat with your GP to see if he/she feels massage or MLD or some other therapy would be helpful.

Hope that helps

Reply
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Hi Amy

Most therapists seeing a new client would begin by taking a brief medical history to identify what sort of massage the client is looking for and prompt for any conditions which could mean massage is contraindicated.

I don't do many treatment these days but back in the 90s when I trained we were taught if a client arrived with chronic high blood pressure or a number of other conditions then we should make sure they checked with their GP if it was ok they had massage. In 15 years I had many clients with chronic high blood pressure who enjoyed regular massage (some even found it helped) and never once had a GP say their patient shouldn't go ahead. Usually GPs are positive as, these days, most are aware of the benefits and there is a lot of clinical evidence supporting massage for conditions such as high blood pressure.

Only had MLD once but have to agree with Jabba and Caroline that it was so gentle I'm not sure it's really massage (I fell asleep!) but certainly it's worth a chat with your GP to see if he/she feels massage or MLD or some other therapy would be helpful.

Hope that helps

O.K - thanks for this post. Will check it out then with my GP.
My other quibble was with the health clinic, i.e. that they showed me an explanatory sheet for MLD which made no mention of any contraindications. This meant that I
might well have had a wasted visit via an appointment. I will take this up with them.

Reply
Posts: 4258
(@jabba-the-hut)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago

Possibly because there are very few contraindications with MLD - but the treating therapist would, as Jinx said, have gone through a consultation with you. Very unlikely that you would be declined treatment with chronic high blood pressure - if the therapist was in the least bit concerned, then a letter would be sent to your GP first.

Reply
Reiki Pixie
Posts: 2380
(@reiki-pixie)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago

Hi Amy

Don't worry about this so-called contraindication. A good well trained therapist will use their professional judgement in all situations and adjust technique accordingly. If you have HBP that is well controlled then the probability that anything would go wrong is almost zero. A good therapist should always ask about BP.

As been mentioned here and on the link, massage can be relaxing and reduce blood pressure. I can't remember if the link mentioned that too much relaxation may (prehaps??) lend to hypotension due to the effects of the medication in reducing BP.

Contraindications to treatments that are taught during massage training, often become indication for treatments when a therapist becomes more experienced. Contraindiaction lists have been developed for the protection of the student whilst training and doing their case studies. But the tutor forgets to tell the student that these lists are not cut in stone, so the student thinks that these contraindications are always to be adhered to.

If massage was soooo dangerous the insurance premium would be sky high, but a typical policy is only ยฃ50 to ยฃ100. This suggests it's a low risk business.

Talking abouts risks and high BP; walking could be risky, so could swimming, so could laughing, playing with children, rolling around in the hay and many human activities ๐Ÿ˜‰ I wished to bring some perspective on the subject, and question some of the scaremongering about the massage profession.

Cheers

RP

Reply
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Thanks Reiki Pixie for the reassurance and better explaining it, i.e. into context. As it's all new to me I am somewhat having to trust what info I come across, but I feel confident now that it is less problematic than I first supposed. Perhaps it was the way I was told not to go ahead (after making my appointment), that rang alarm bells.

Reply
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

I know this is 4 years on since the last post (above) but I thought I would update the situation since, today, I had an LMD massage! It's just light strokes so is in no way risky for those with high blood pressure. I was told I didn't have to take my clothes off but, it transpired, I did! I was allowed to keep my knickers on and was covered by a towel - also I had a woman masseur so I was OK about it. In fact, I preferred it since I was concerned that such light strokes would not be effective over clothing.

The massage went well. I can't say at this stage (one hour later) that there is any noticeable effect but it may be too soon to say. The lymphs affect immunity so maybe the beneficial effects will develop later.

Really I wanted a shiatsu massage which (I have read) is beneficial to those with high blood pressure. Unfortunately the only local place that does it charges over the odds, i.e. the standard rate is around ยฃ50-ยฃ55 an hour and she charges ยฃ70! The only other one I found reasonably near (e.g. 5 - 10 miles) was not a registered practitioner for this and her phone manner unprofessional.

If anyone here knows of a registered shiatsu masseur operating in south west London that charges the going rate please PM me.

I had a brief shiatsu massage at an alternative festival once - around 5 - 10 mins - taster session in a tent. Before the massage I was low in energy (not slept well and a tad irritable). I was surprised to find that, after the massage, I felt back to sorts, no low energy at all! Wonderful!

Reply
Crowan
Posts: 3429
(@crowan)
Famed Member
Joined: 14 years ago

By coincidence, Amy, we have had a student staying with us for counselling, who is also a fully trained shiatsu practitioner. He is in Leeds, but I asked him if he could recommend anyone in London. He said you should get in touch with the London School of Shiatsu. This is who he trained with and he rates them highly. They could be able to recommend someone they've trained. Alternatively, they run sessions where people can have treatments from nearly qualified Third year students. These should be nowhere near as expensive as ยฃ70. (He thought nearer ยฃ30.)
I hope you manage to find someone good.

Reply
amy green
Posts: 2258
Topic starter
(@amy-green)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago

By coincidence, Amy, we have had a student staying with us for counselling, who is also a fully trained shiatsu practitioner. He is in Leeds, but I asked him if he could recommend anyone in London. He said you should get in touch with the London School of Shiatsu. This is who he trained with and he rates them highly. They could be able to recommend someone they've trained. Alternatively, they run sessions where people can have treatments from nearly qualified Third year students. These should be nowhere near as expensive as ยฃ70. (He thought nearer ยฃ30.)
I hope you manage to find someone good.

Thanks. Yes I know about this school, i.e. it is where I found out who was and wasn't registered as a practitioner!

Unfortunately they are based in North London so this makes enquiring about a cheaper, student option not really practical. (I avoid going into central London with the recent high state of alerts).

Reply
Posts: 176
 Mtbw
(@mtbw)
Estimable Member
Joined: 5 years ago

I'm a full time carer and have got out of condition, e.g. slight oedema (around ankles), high blood pressure and am fairly obese now - around 15 stone. I'm 63.

Am I too fat to be able to benefit from a lymphatic massage, i.e. will the layer of fat make massaging my lymph glands problematic? I feel I need to boost my immune system, get some kind of vitality returned. I think this is the right massage if I'm not
too obese for it. Does it require being naked? Oils? (Both of which don't appeal).

I once had a shiatsu massage which did wonders in aligning my energy level. I guess
this doesn't boost the immune system though? Would this be a better option, given
my condition? If so, again, would I have to be naked and are oils used?

Sorry, but you can not massage lymph glands!!!!!!!!!!!
Lymphatic drainage can be performed in form of massage or as a reflexological approach. Your weight plays no role because this is superficial massage and not deep tissue movement. It will help as from my experience.

Reply
Posts: 176
 Mtbw
(@mtbw)
Estimable Member
Joined: 5 years ago

I know this is 4 years on since the last post (above) but I thought I would update the situation since, today, I had an LMD massage! It's just light strokes so is in no way risky for those with high blood pressure. I was told I didn't have to take my clothes off but, it transpired, I did! I was allowed to keep my knickers on and was covered by a towel - also I had a woman masseur so I was OK about it. In fact, I preferred it since I was concerned that such light strokes would not be effective over clothing.

The massage went well. I can't say at this stage (one hour later) that there is any noticeable effect but it may be too soon to say. The lymphs affect immunity so maybe the beneficial effects will develop later.

Really I wanted a shiatsu massage which (I have read) is beneficial to those with high blood pressure. Unfortunately the only local place that does it charges over the odds, i.e. the standard rate is around ยฃ50-ยฃ55 an hour and she charges ยฃ70! The only other one I found reasonably near (e.g. 5 - 10 miles) was not a registered practitioner for this and her phone manner unprofessional.

If anyone here knows of a registered shiatsu masseur operating in south west London that charges the going rate please PM me.

I had a brief shiatsu massage at an alternative festival once - around 5 - 10 mins - taster session in a tent. Before the massage I was low in energy (not slept well and a tad irritable). I was surprised to find that, after the massage, I felt back to sorts, no low energy at all! Wonderful!

The best way to choose a properly trained therapist is to check on CNHC website and choose nearest to you

Reply
Share: