Cough, nausea and f...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Cough, nausea and fatigue from being in new house

3 Posts
3 Users
0 Likes
2,510 Views
Posts: 1
Topic starter
(@deafpanda)
New Member
Joined: 11 years ago

Hi there,

I recently bought a house with my partner and since we moved in a few weeks ago, I have felt sick, wheezy and tired whenever I've been in the house for more than a couple of hours. I notice now when I come home after being outside, as soon as I step in the door I can feel a slight tightness in my chest and an irritation in my throat.

I have not had this reaction to any house I've previously lived in, or been in for any length of time.

It's an old house that has had some damp problems in the past, but there are only a couple of patches of visible damp, so it's probably not that?

It has recently been refurbished (with the cheapest materials possible), something like 3-6 months ago it had new carpet, a new kitchen, new paint on the walls etc. Could it be VOC emissions from the carpet, paint, and the plywood in the kitchen?

Does anyone have any advice? Can anyone say what it is most likely to be, out of the things in this house? I am of course airing the house as much as I can - I'm sitting next to an open window right now as that's the only way I can comfortably stay in the house for any length of time!

Thanks a lot for reading.

Will

2 Replies
Posts: 4258
(@jabba-the-hut)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago

Has the damp been chemically treated by professionals? We have a very old house (300+yrs), and when it was treated for damp and rot (woodworm and wet rot) in the early 80's I moved out for months!

It may be worth a chat with your local Environmental Health department - they don't just investigate dodgy restaurants or vermin infestation!

Also, have a chat with the carpet supplier - they may use chemicals at the production stage - if you explain that you have developed a few medical symptoms and are trying to track the source, they might give you some details. Chemicals used in paint should (!) be listed on the tin.

Reply
Energylz
Posts: 16602
(@energylz)
Member
Joined: 20 years ago

It's an old house that has had some damp problems in the past, but there are only a couple of patches of visible damp, so it's probably not that?

I would say that rather it probably IS that. Mould spores will carry in the air very easily, and if you are susceptible to breathing difficulties, they will certainly be a good one for triggering them.

It has recently been refurbished (with the cheapest materials possible), something like 3-6 months ago it had new carpet, a new kitchen, new paint on the walls etc. Could it be VOC emissions from the carpet, paint, and the plywood in the kitchen?

The VOC's from paint are mostly gone within days, and shouldn't be a problem once the paint has dried fully. Most glue or dust in the plywood is 'inside' it, so unless you're actually cutting it or chipping away as it, that's not likely a problem. Carpets on the other hand could be a problem, especially if they have a cheap rubber backing to them or have been washed in certain chemicals.

Still I think the damp and mould is the most likely reason, and airing the house will help to an extent, but it doesn't solve the actually cause of the problem.

All Love and Reiki Hugs

Reply
Share: