HPC and CSP vs BASR...
 
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HPC and CSP vs BASRaT


stephstar10
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Hello,

I have recently graduated with a Sports Science BSc Degree and looking to become a Sports Physiotherapist. I'm currently looking into the Accelerated Master courses for Physiotherapy and Sports Rehabilitation. For Physiotherapy I know you have you register with HPC and CSP to become a fully chartered physiotherapist, and for a Sports Rehabilitator you will need to register with BASRaT.

I would like to know what is the difference between the governing bodies? And what route would be better for me to take for a career as a Sports Physiotherapist?

Thanks
Stephstar10

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biggazfromlincoln
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Joined: 16 years ago

Hello,

I have recently graduated with a Sports Science BSc Degree and looking to become a Sports Physiotherapist. I'm currently looking into the Accelerated Master courses for Physiotherapy and Sports Rehabilitation. For Physiotherapy I know you have you register with HPC and CSP to become a fully chartered physiotherapist, and for a Sports Rehabilitator you will need to register with BASRaT.

I would like to know what is the difference between the governing bodies? And what route would be better for me to take for a career as a Sports Physiotherapist?

Thanks
Stephstar10

sorry to tell you it is unlikley to get accellerated entry onto masters, you do not have to register with basrat , they are not a regulator, they are a professional association,

I would use the search facility on here to research the industry, at a time when the NHS is shedding Phyiso jobs and employing sports therapists on half the wages you would do well to make an informed decision, Ive recently heard of a number of physio students unable to get work placements to complete their BSc

sports physio is another study term ontop of normal training

FA are now calling their courses medical and sports therapy, top clubs are looking for sports therapists, and only dated sports bodies are employing physios, I just had a telephone discussion with a top EIS Doc who told me they are fed up with the varying quality of hands on treatments from physios and sports masseurs and looking for soft tissue therapists with advanced hands on skills.

HTH
BGFL

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sportstherapy
Posts: 1440
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Joined: 18 years ago

Hello,

I have recently graduated with a Sports Science BSc Degree and looking to become a Sports Physiotherapist. I'm currently looking into the Accelerated Master courses for Physiotherapy and Sports Rehabilitation. For Physiotherapy I know you have you register with HPC and CSP to become a fully chartered physiotherapist, and for a Sports Rehabilitator you will need to register with BASRaT.

I would like to know what is the difference between the governing bodies? And what route would be better for me to take for a career as a Sports Physiotherapist?

Thanks
Stephstar10

If you want to become a Sports Physiotherapist you will need to go down the CSP/HPC route, not BASRaT.

You may be very lucky and get onto an accelerated MSc, though I know the vast majority have to go back and do the full three year BSc. To do Sports Physiotherapy, you need to have the Physiotherapy BSc.

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HygeiaUK
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Joined: 17 years ago

Differences

Physiotherapist and Physical Therapist are legally protected titles in the UK.
So if you call yourself a Physiotherapist of any kind or mislead folk into believing you are a Physiotherapist you need to have completed a course leading to registration with the HCPC.

If you are not registered with the HCPC then there is a £5k fine

If you've already completed a first degree in a science you can do a Masters in Physiotherapy. Then you can join the HCPC and also the CSP who provide insurance which will cover you if you comply with their codes of professional membership.

If you have worked in the EU or other countries as a Physiotherapist then its not automatic that you can use the title here. To use the title you need to be registered with the HCPC.

The misleading the public side is interesting because a fair few people use the term Physio when they talk about their work in sport. For example many people who work with football or rugby clubs refer to themself as the "team Physio". I think this is misleading because I've frequently had people contact me for advice on their injury and when asked if they had seen anyone else its quite common to hear they had their injury assessed by the club Physio. They genuinely dont understand the difference and consider that a Physio is a Physio. It seems their club therapist hasn't bothered to put them straight and seems to be playing the game of I am the club Physio
.
If you are a sports massage practitioner,or a sport therapist, personal trainer, coach or whatever. this is what you qualified as, not a Physio. I haven't heard of any courses training people to be a Physio because of the protection of title. So look at your certificate and use the title on the paper.

I would encourage all people working in sport to be proud of their 'title' and use the one you got from your course and if you want to work as a Physio / Physiotherapist do just what this questioner is thinking of doing and get the qualifications, register with the HCPC and join the CSP and work with the other 48,000 people who are complying with the regulations.

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HygeiaUK
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Joined: 17 years ago

Reference post above..

In response to..

[COLOR="Sienna"]FA are now calling their courses medical and sports therapy, top clubs are looking for sports therapists, and only dated sports bodies are employing physios, I just had a telephone discussion with a top EIS Doc who told me they are fed up with the varying quality of hands on treatments from physios and sports masseurs and looking for soft tissue therapists with advanced hands on skills

The first part with regard the FA calling their courses medical and sports therapy is to fit with regulation of title.

The second part is more around the difference in cost between employing a HCPC registered Physiotherapist and the practice of a sport therapist. Most lower clubs can only afford a very small fee for matchday cover and perhaps a cheap club night clinic of sport massage. Although many Physiotherapist's provide good quality hands on treatment they still change more than sports therapists and rarely do routine repeat business work on people who are asymptomatic. So its very unusual for a Physiotherapist to see people week in week out for a massage. In the NHS they usually see 4 new patients every day with a clinic caseload of up to 16 a day. Its very different from the massage practitioner role.
Plus in some clubs with a Doctor, the Doctor will often want to hold on to the diagnostics, injections etc and probably wont see a need to have a Physiotherapist on board who will be able to do the same thing as themself.
Effectively its cheaper for a club with a Doctor to just have sports massage practitioner to refer players to after they have seen them.
Its a bit silly really because there is arguably no need for the Doctor who will charge a lot more than a Physiotherapist.

A club could easily have a Physiotherapist in place of the Doctor and sports massage pratitioner working accepting referrals for a big reduction in cost.

Physiotherapist have had professional autonomy since the 1980's

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