What is osteopathy?
 
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What is osteopathy?


Anahata
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Osteopathy
(in brief)

Osteopathy is a safe and natural approach to health care, treating individuals for health problems from the trauma of birth to arthritis of the elderly, from cradle to rocking chair.

The Osteopath usually considers the musculo-skeletal system as the physical expression of the person rather than merely as protection and support for the vital organs.

A well practised, highly trained sense of touch is used to identify dysfunction within the body. This is then treated to remove/reduce all impediments to improve/restore mobility and balance and thereby enhancing well being.

A range of techniques are commonly used including soft tissue stretching, rhythmic passive joint movements and manipulation. Usually when treating the elderly and children the very gentle release techniques of Cranio-Sacral Osteopathy are used.

Osteopathy is a particularly successful approach to treatment of spinal pain most commonly in the lower back and neck, but often referring pain to the lower and upper limbs respectively. Similarly restriction and pain originating in the limbs such as arthritis, injury and repetitive strain condition may also be helped.

There is also ongoing research into the effectiveness of Osteopathic treatment with conditions that you may not have considered that may help with, including;-Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), ME (Myaligic Encephalomylitis)/ CFS (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), menstrual problems, problems conceiving, amongst others.

More info & links on osteopathic site below & for other conditions check the A-Z on Osteopathy section.

Good luck in finding your answer - And. 😉

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Anahata
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RE: What is osteopathy?

About osteopathy

Osteopathy is a way of detecting and treating damaged parts of the body such as muscles, ligaments, nerves and joints. When the body is balanced and efficient, just like a well tuned engine, it will function with the minimum of wear and tear, leaving more energy for living.

What do osteopaths treat?
Osteopaths treat a variety of common conditions including changes to posture in pregnancy; babies with colic or sleeplessness, repetitive strain injury, postural problems caused by driving or work strain, the pain of arthritis and sports injuries.

Is osteopathy regulated?
The Statutory Register of the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC) opened on 9 May 1998. The title "osteopath" became protected by law from 9 May 2000 when the transitional registration period ended. As a result it is a criminal offence, liable to prosecution, to describe oneself as an osteopath in the UK unless registered with the GOsC.
The GOsC regulates, promotes and develops the profession of osteopathy, maintaining a Statutory Register of those entitled to practise osteopathy. Only practitioners meeting the high standards of safety and competency are eligible to join this register. Proof of good health, good character and professional indemnity insurance cover is also a requirement.

What qualifications do osteopaths have?
Osteopaths undertake four to five-year honours degree programmes underpinned by thorough clinical training.

Source - The General Osteopathic Council - [DLMURL] http://www.osteopathy.org.uk/about_gosc/[/DLMURL]

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Anahata
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RE: What is osteopathy?

The Original Principles of Osteopathy as laid down by Dr Andrew Taylor Still in the late 1800's.

The Interrelation of Structure and Function

If the structure of the body is compromised, (i.e. injury, strain, overuse, etc.), then it is likely to have a detrimental effect on the function (i.e. stiffness, pain or instability). This also works in reverse, in that, say, a lack of stretching before & after exercise or lack of exercise in general (functional) - will cause a shortening of the muscles (structural) leading to stiffness.

The Body as a Unit (or whole)

Dr Still used this expression over 50 years before the actual naming of Holism by Jan Smutts (1926). In short it means that each part effects each & every other part and that the ‘whole’ is greater than merely the sum of these parts. An example might be:- short hamstring muscles at the back of the thighs may lead to a backwards tilt of the pelvis. This in turn flattens the curve of the low back (making disc injuries more likely) and the rest of the spine above has to adapt to stop us tipping over. As the body strives to keep eyes & ears level the upper neck is usually the final point of compensation, which may result in head & neck pain.

The Medicine Chest Within

Again, A.T.Still was ahead of his time. Bearing in mind that very little was known then of the immune, healing, chemical & hormonal systems of the body. In short, he was suggesting that we should stimulate and support the persons own healing systems within. In doing so, the body is able to resolve all but the most severe of conditions.

The Rule of the Artery Reigns Supreme
(One would include in this venous & lymph drainage.)

For healing to occur there needs to be a good blood supply to be able to provide the nutrients and immune cells to the area. Equally, there needs to be effective drainage via the veins and lymph vessels from the area. This is to remove the waste materials and by products of the healing process, such as inflammatory fluids. Inflammation is the source of the pain in most painful conditions.

Full version here -

An article I wrote a few years ago - The Whole of Holism is here -

Andrew.

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peter4health
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RE: What is osteopathy?

An osteopath is like a human mechanic. But also aware of how anatomy interacts with physiology.
However, the practice of osteopathy varies from practitioner to practitioner. In common should be a basic core appreciation of clinical examination. urther to this, are a variety of ways of assessing the body, to find out where it is not working, or where there are restrictions.
Then osteopaths also may take into account maintaining factors, such as posture, lifestyle, nutrition, exercise which all combine to influence the person.
Certain osteopaths may also specialise in different areas: children, the elderly, sports injuries, TMJ (jaw), pregnancy etc.
Find an osteopath who suits you, and your condition.
Good luck. I hope this helps
Peter

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Anahata
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RE: What is osteopathy?

Thanks for that one Pete!

And.

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Anahata
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RE: What is osteopathy?

Resources for Osteopaths, seminars, conferences, postgraduate CPD course, research databases, etc.

The Top 223 osteopathic websites by CBEL.com

And.

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Medos
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Osteopathy is a manual method of care, based on the knowledge of biomechanics and the interrelationships between several tissues of the organism; it has made steady progresses since then, thanks to the contribution of the research and to the practice of ten million osteopaths throughout the world.

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Mike Primak
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Hi! I came across this thread in an effort to find some good osteopathy forums. I have an infographic which helps explain what osteopathy is. The pictures and charts make it a little more engaging than plain text, so I hope it will draw people in and help answer the question What Is Osteopathy.

Anyone interested can check it out here:

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Mike
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Anyone ineterested in "What is Osteopathy" we have a good page here: https://www.healthypages.co.uk/therapies/osteopathy/

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