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Is colonic hydrotherapy safe for me


Njdrumma
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Im 19 years old muscular and iv been sick since july my doctors say i am hyperthyroid. Ever since iv been sick my bowels are always long hard and thick. Sometimes i might get think stools or diarrhea. I want to try colon therapy to get some mess out and then start with a healthy diet. When i eat alot of fiber and drink alot of water my body still does not get alot of poop out thats why i want to try the colonic therapy. I just wanted to know if it would be safe.

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kvdp
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Probably perfectly safe, but a professional therapist will take a detailed case history and make sure. I do not see thyroid problems listed as a contraindication (reason against), but if there is anything else, then the therapist will know.

I would say there was a very good case in favour of a colonic here. Good habits and loo-retraining are also important - if we don't take enough time at the right time, and in complete privacy, or we are always on edge and ready for action, the bowels can suffer in many ways.

In the broader sense, chronic constipation could have a lot to do with the hormonal problem. Regulation of all kinds of things can suffer.

However, clearing the drains is only part of the story, you rightly mention that other things need attention also - some of those might not be obvious. If you are not yet on medication that makes it much easier to help, as medication can stabilise a situation but then has a tendency to lock you into it.

As a quick starter for ten, thyroid can become overactive when the adrenal glands become exhausted. You mention you are muscular - could you be overdoing it at the gym and not getting enough rest and recovery?

A holiday (lounging on beach, not hiking in mountains) and/or a few days of fasting could make a world of difference. Get guidance if you're considering fasting - it is a brilliant tool for 'rebooting' the metabolism, but if done badly can make things worse.

General Osteopathic Treatment (contact Institute of Classical Osteopathy), Rolfing, a good Naturopath or Homoeopath could be extremely useful. Contact the British Natural Hygeine Society for fasting and nutrition guidance.

But really there are a million good therapies out there, but not all therapists have the vision, so go on a personal recommendation. And yes, a colonic could be a very good place to start.

Best wishes 🙂

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Njdrumma
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Thank you for replying! The thing is iv never been a workout person the only thing that i did before i got sick that was close to working out would be playing drums. I did tae kwon doe for a few years but stopped when i turned 13 years old it involved a lot of working out and i guess that was what helped me bulid muscle and just havering a good metabolism helped me maintain it without working out. Now i have so many problems.
here are my symptoms(i know i mentioned digestion already)
anxiety, long hard thick bowels, constipation, not digesting food right, eye light flashes, lethargic,depression, mood swings, muscle and nerve pains, huge headache everyday, feeling like the need to eat food all the time but it isnt like hunger pains, lack of concentration, insomnia, sweating, feeling off,odd strange all the time, eye irratation, low libido, lack of interests in things i used to like, earaches, tingiling in hands and feet.

I really cant enjoy anything anymore and starting out my first year of college i cant even function, retain information that well. I am worried about my future but i should be able to get this undercontrol

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kvdp
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The bottom line is that you are probably toxic for some reason. It's a very general diagnosis and you need to find out why. You're definitely thinking along the right lines with a colonic, if that helps it will confirm things, but is only part of the solution.

The main source of toxicity in my view is our own metabolic waste. When we eat constantly our body has to deal with the incoming stream so shuts down the outgoing, and we accumulate uric acid rapidly. Check the effect of uric acid toxicity on the web, it's a pretty good match.

Could you be dehydrated? This is extremely common and can cause much of what you describe, starting with compulsive eating. If prolonged it could lead to marked toxicity, especially if other factors are involved. Start each day with a pint of water and aim to get through at least 2-3 litres a day. If this is a factor you'll notice benefit quickly. You'll pee lots initially but that does settle down.

Digestion needs a break - the desire to eat you rightly notice is an illusion, food staves off the discomfort which is actually caused by your body attempting to eliminate waste, hence a bad habit forms. Fasting may be ideal, but as mentioned, get guidance. Daily 'fasting', ie not eating too early, too late, or between meals is vital to give your organs a chance. In the morning, let your body finish eliminating before giving it more to deal with

Are you sure your kidneys are ok? Has your doctor checked this?

Other things will cause retention of waste, it is a product of the whole metabolism; this side of things can only be discussed in a consultation, but addressing this is what we as practitioners do. Toxicity leads to toxicity, thyroid or other regulatory problems can be a result and then go on to be a cause. So these are chicken-egg problems.

Incidentally stress will tend to create toxicity.

The other side of this is environmental toxins - are you being exposed to anything? eg living next to a farm and breathing sprays? Houses are full of sources of toxins, especially new houses with new carpets and furniture and windows that are never opened, air fresheners, cleaning products, toiletries etc etc. Supermarket food can be pretty bad, living on coke and pizza could potentially do this.

Heavy metal poisoning would also be a fair suspect. Leaking metal fillings is possible, if you have any then get them checked, or better still changed for white ones.

An even more likely source, however, of metal poisoning would be vaccinations, where mercury, and these days aluminium, are part of the formula. Vaccines can cause other unwanted effects also, the link is often not noticed because it can take a few weeks or months for the effect to show. If you think this is likely then it needs reporting on the 'yellow card' scheme which your GP will know about.

Unravelling the effects of metal poisoning, or more general vaccine problems (or toxicity in general) is another story, it would take an even longer discussion. Suffice to say that it is vital to locate and eliminate any major source of toxicity if that's what we're dealing with, and doing that would go a long way.

Lastly, consider the side-effects of drugs - even common remedies such as paracetemol can occasionally cause huge problems. So if you're taking anything consider this as a possibility, and check the packet inserts.

If any of this strikes a chord then do keep asking questions.

Good luck:)

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kvdp
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Duplicate post - deleted

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ava
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Hi njdrumma

Kvdp's advice is what you should mainly be following... because ultimately you do need to have a professional (colonic hydrotherapist, a nutritionist or someone else) give you some guidance... but I'd like to add something that I think will help.

My suggestion (and I can feel kvdp groaning because I suggest this in every second post 😉 ) is to consider taking [url]magnesium citrate powder[/url].

The reason I suggest magnesium citrate powder (don't get any other form of magnesium because it will just irritate your digestion) is because low magnesium status is associated with many of the symptoms you list:

anxiety
long hard thick bowels/constipation*
eye light flashes (more specifically floaters)
lethargy*
depression*
mood swings*
muscle and nerve pains (muscle spasms, and yes muscle pain)*
feeling like the need to eat food all the time... (i.e. food cravings... usually the result of unstable blood sugar)*
lack of concentration*
insomnia*
sweating (again because of unstable blood sugar)
eye irratation (floaters, and eyelid tics)
lack of interests in things i used to like (symptom of depression)*

I suggest that you buy some cheap plastic measuring spoons (like [DLMURL="http://www.hardware-ironmongers.com/details.aspx?code=7212283"]this[/DLMURL], from Tesco or similar) and take the magnesium citrate:
1/2 teaspoon in 250ml liquid (not milk) before breakfast
1/2 teaspoon in 250ml liquid (not milk) before dinner
1/2 teaspoon in 250ml liquid (not milk) before bedtime

You should expect to see some improvement in your bowel symptoms in about 4 days. Please don't take more than suggested. And if your bowels become too loose please cut back your dosage a little until they are 'normal'.

Again I say that kvdp's advice is sound, and that your first priority is to follow it and seek out professional advice. The magnesium citrate powder will help you, but it is best to get professional guidance.

Please note that all of the things with a (*) next to them are clinical symptoms of depression. I have an interest in mood-gut connection (as does CarolineN, who may pop here to offer advice) and I am worried about your depression symptoms. Depression affects the motility of the gut because serotonin (a neurochemical which affects sleep and mood) is needed for the motility of the large bowel. An effect of antidepressants is the return to normal of bowel motility and... alleviation of constipation. Depression symptoms can improve when your gut problems are addressed, and likewise gut symptoms are improved when your depression problems are addressed. Magnesium is fabulous because it's helpful for both mood and gut symptoms. I take it for that reason, and it's made a big difference to me.

My feeling would be to see a nutritionist - as well as the colonic hydrotherapist. In the meantime please try to do the following:

1. increase your water consumption (buy bottled water for the meantime if you don't like the taste of tap water) - and drink a 1.5L bottle every day

2. increase your consumption of fruit and vegetables to whatever you can manage. Choose fruits and vegetables that you like.

3. eat wholegrains - white rice and white bread are constipating. Choose wholemeal bread and brown rice and wholemeal pasta

4. take a multivitamin - but choose one WITHOUT IRON (Boots sells them) - because iron is constipating.

Good luck, and let us know how you go.

Ava x

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kvdp
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Hi Ava, no, not groaning:), I have just learned something interesting. I see no disagreement.

What I would add is that when mineral status is in question, it would be wise to try and confirm this objectively if possible, and also to check for other deficiencies.

Further, I would add that deficiency syndromes can result from absorbtion problems, not just supply. Toxicity can easily cause this, but if it wasn't there to begin with it is now. These are chicken and egg situations all over. I generally say, if the toxic state is left unaddressed, everything will remain up the creek, whatever else is done.

Anyway, I think we agree that direct practitioner input is required.

There, and I haven't even mentioned my own favourite - epsom salts!;)

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ava
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There, and I haven't even mentioned my own favourite - epsom salts!;)

Ah... I never knew that we shared the Magnesium Love... me citrate, you sulphate!

I hear you 100% re the absorption conflict. I'm with you on this - you are what you digest/absorb. My anecdotal experience (myself and a couple of others) is that when you resolve a sluggish bowel - over time your digestion/absorption improves. When peristalsis improves - the contractions can dislodge impacted material from the bowel wall and thus increase the usable viable surface area of the large bowel... and to a lesser extent the small intestine. [This requires targeted efforts.] So, I guess I am jamming open the door with the magnesium citrate route... by correcting low magnesium status you are enabling the bowel to better function and to better absorb foods.

Magnesium status isn't reliably assessed via blood tests because most magnesium is stored in the muscle tissue... which is why a cardiac arrest may be your first sign that you are low in magnesium. And... I'll find you the reference if you are interested... magnesium status of folk dying from cardiac arrest is very low. Whilst I'm not entirely convinced of its reliability a hair mineral analysis test can be insightful. But personally I'd be more reliant on the presentation of a suite low status symptoms.

Ava x

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Patchouli
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.

Magnesium status isn't reliably assessed via blood tests because most magnesium is stored in the muscle tissue... Whilst I'm not entirely convinced of its reliability a hair mineral analysis test can be insightful. But personally I'd be more reliant on the presentation of a suite low status symptoms.

Ava x

A good nutritionist would use a mineral tally test (I can test for at least 8 of the main different minerals and do this generally in consultations)

This is composed of the minerals in a solution which the client is given to taste, depending on what is tasted would give an indication as to what is short and what is ok. IMO it is more reliable tha hair mineral analysis.

Regards a colonic....the colonic itself is perfunctory, a good clean out but unless gut issues such as absorption/inflammation/motility/flora etc are adressed the initial problem won't resolve.

Best look fo a colonic/nutritionist. I know of one in Chelsea, London. She isn't cheap but she is good. There are others depending where the OP lives.

Joyce

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ava
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A good nutritionist would use a mineral tally test (I can test for at least 8 of the main different minerals and do this generally in consultations)

Ooh, I've never had one of these (other than Zinc challenge by Metagenics... but I purchased that myself). I'd love to hear more about the other minerals you can test for, and what you use. Neither does my own nutritionist use challenges - she uses the hair mineral analysis, and objective deficiency symptoms - so this is new territory for both of us!

Ava x

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aylesburyspa
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Tried it and it really works - but almost better than the therapy is the advice your therapist will almost certainly give you on diet, drinking water, exercise, even how to chew properly! Try it and I very much doubt that you will regret it. In your case I suspect upping the exercise is key. Good luck with your efforts to sort it out.

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CarolineN
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HI Njdrumma

Welcome to HP. Sorry to hear you have been under the weather for so long.

Some excellent advice has been given here with good explantions! I don't think I can add much except to say read this all very carfully - print it out, write notes and questions, find yourself a suitable therapist - [url]try here [/url]- and ask!

Wishing you all the best - and if you have more questions then do ask!

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