Help with dairy int...
 
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Help with dairy intolerance!!


Bambi
Posts: 27
Topic starter
(@bambi)
Eminent Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Hi everybody. I actually posted on here two years ago, I dont know where time has gone!! My symptoms have become worse than ever and I am so confused.
I have really bad mucus in my throat which is clearly dairy related, it is really driving me crazy as I'm aware of it every single time I swallow. I did go on to the lactofree website and bought the products but am still getting symptoms. I also experience very bad diarrhoea which comes on very quickly. I've had enough now, my doctor has no interest what so ever and just prescribes an Imodium equivalent. I have had a gastroscopy and endoscopy which came back normal and I'm sure it is something I am eating but dont know how to go about sorting it out. I had thai beef curry and a cookie today - the mucus was there straight afterwards and will stay for a good two or three days, I dont know whether it was something in the sauce or something in the cookie. Then I thought to myself, I had roast beef and vegetables on Sunday and I had terrible diarrhoea straight after and wondered what on earth had caused that! I am now thinking I had beef today (Wednes) and beef on Sunday and wondering whether it could be the beef as well????????????????????? It is driving me round the bend!
Can anybody please help!
Lots of love Bambi xx

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CarolineN
Posts: 4760
(@carolinen)
Famed Member
Joined: 12 years ago

Hi Bambi

So sorry to hear you are still struggling. It sounds lile you have a good dose of food intolerances! 😮 and this clearly needs sorting out (I've been there too).

Your best bet is to find a nutritional therapist who will help sort this out with you. See the [url]BANT website [/url]to find a practitioner near you. Nutritional therapists are trained to help people with this problem (probably multiple intolerances) and it is very difficult to sort out if you haven't had a test for them. You will also need guidance for a balanced food intake when there is a list of foods that you will probably have to avoid - my daughter's list even included pepper, which when I gave her some inadvertently gave her diarrhoea! What affects people and how it affects them can vary enormously, any part of the body being affected and any type of food or additive can be involved, plus all sorts of environmental allergens (some 50,000 new chemicals have been introduced into the environment in the last 100 years) and the body sometimes struggles to cope.

There is a lot that can be done but not in five minutes! The gut needs healing, probiotics will be needed, a list of foods to avoid, possible tests for parasites too. Far too much to sort out on a forum!:)

If you are interested in finding out as much as possible for yourself the Elizabeth Lipski's Digestive Wellness is brilliant, availableor [DLMURL="http://www.nutricentre.com/s-3570-author-elizabeth-lipski.aspx"]here.[/DLMURL]

Wishing you all the best

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Bambi
Posts: 27
Topic starter
(@bambi)
Eminent Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Thank you Caroline, I will have a look at the links for the book! Most helpful, Bambi x

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Life Designs
Posts: 7
(@life-designs)
Active Member
Joined: 11 years ago

Hi Bambi

Yes it sounds like you have definitely got more than one intolerance/allergy going on.
Your body needs a chance to rebalance and restore itself so as simple a diet as possible is recommended. Hold back on the beef and meat in general with the exception of some organic chicken and fish. LOTS of leafy green veggies (raw/steamed) and yes get some good quality probiotics. Wheat and dairy should definitely be off the menu as should all processed sugary/salty foods.

I'd definitely agree that going to see a nutritionist in your local area is the best idea; someone who can spend time with you going through in detail your problems and I'm sure you will soon be back on the road to health and wellbeing.

Good luck!

Saira.

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kvdp
Posts: 1033
 kvdp
(@kvdp)
Noble Member
Joined: 12 years ago

Hi Bambi
immodium is clearly not the answer, if you force your body to hold onto matter it wishes to expel, you're at risk of reactive arthritis and a host of other consequences.

I'd put this somewhere well on the way to IBS on the spectrum of intolerances, but the name is not really helpful. In essence, there is an imbalance in the autonomic nervous system. This system distributes blood to where it's needed for whatever it's doing, but there isn't enough to do everything at once - you can't run from a tiger and digest lunch at the same time.

So when regulation is stuck with a tendency towards fight-or-flight, as it very often can be, your body gets rid of anything it can't digest very easily so that it doesn't putrify inside you. Careful dietary choices help, in the same way that limping helps a broken leg, but doesn't change the fact that the leg is broken.

Some of us do treat patients with similar situations, roughly speaking, the spine is the switchboard of the organs and these problems are usually reflected there. This idea has gone out of fashion as lacking a hard evidence-base, but in fact a lot of work was done on this several decades ago, and the rationale appears sound. The bottom line, though, is that people do seem to benefit in many cases, in fact 100 years ago digestive problems were the biggest aspect of osteopathic work.

In any case, a good self-help resource is Jane Gotteschal's 'breaking the vicious cycle', and you might want to undergo a supervised fast for a few days, to give your digestion time to calm down and repair, and your body to rest.

Bear in mind also that as well as what you eat, when is important - not too late at night, not too early in the morning, and in what combinations, protein and starch at the same meal make life harder. Adequate hydration, preferably not actually during meals, is important also. Your body needs to prepare for digestion, ie anticipation, not just grabbing a sandwich, and it needs restful calm to allow digestion.

Mucus tends to form when we are over-acidic too, eating plenty of fresh fruit and veg and avoiding processed food, cheese, wheat, cola etc will help that. Ironically, citrus fruit tend to counter acidity once digested, so oranges, grapefruit etc ideal. Big subject, direct help needed I'd say.

Hope that helps.

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Sarah7
Posts: 412
(@sarah7)
Reputable Member
Joined: 14 years ago

Can I also recommend The pH Miracle by Robert Young.

I'm reading it currently and I'm having loads of 'a-ha' moments as I read it coz it's all making sense. It's not just the milk for me, it's also wheat and red meat. This book is fabulous and explains how our acidic diets are so bad for us. Lots of green vegetables are now on my menu.

I would add I'm not a nutritionist so as mentioned above it's also good to get a proper diagnosis from a trained therapist.

Sx

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