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Qigong


Tashanie
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I am currently training to teach Shibashi Qigong. I am really interested to see that Tai chi has been shown to help in falls prevention....something that is quite a priority for the NHS at the moment . Is anyone involved in teaching Qigong within an NHS environment?

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Crowan
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Not answering your question at all, I'm afraid, πŸ™‚ but my partner had a brain op. about 3 years ago and has been left with severely damaged balance. It is her opinion (and that of physiotherapists that she has seen) that her balance is as good as it is only because she has done Tai Chi and Qigong for many years.

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darrensurrey
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Tai chi teaches you to balance beyond using your "sense of balance" ie inner ear. It's saved me falling down the stairs when I had a labrynthitis episode at the top of my stairs! It's not just about knowing the techniques but being able to put them into practice instinctively. The technique is as simple as sinking the weight to reduce instability - but your natural reaction is to try to raise yourself up which makes you become more unstable rather than lowering into a more stable stance. Regular practice means you will lower your centre of gravity. Additionally, regular practice strengthens the legs so you are more able to control your weight placement - tai chi is basically very slow lunges. πŸ˜€

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Reiki Pixie
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I haven't taught Tai Chi & Qi Gong in a formal NHS context.

Have taught though within mental health and drug rehab centres.

Also taught the Shibashi Taiji-Qigong for several years to young adults with various learning disabilities. Many of the students have poor coordination, but after a couple of terms many of them had better coordination and flow in movements. Surprising considering that many had also physical issues, too numerous to list.

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Tashanie
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Just to let you know I have completed my training πŸ™‚

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Crowan
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Just to let you know I have completed my training πŸ™‚

Well done. Did you enjoy it?

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Tashanie
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I did πŸ™‚

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darrensurrey
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Congrats. Who did you train with? How long will sessions be?

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Tashanie
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I trained with Debbie Gannon in Hinckley. The normal pattern is to run classes of an hour which allows enough time for people to arrive, get settled, actually do the moves (19 in total including standing zen at the end) ...then have time for a quick chat and get out..

The actual set takes between 20 and 30 minutes to do depending on how slowly you do the moves and how many times you repeat each move.

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Tashanie
Posts: 1924
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I trained with Debbie Gannon in Hinckley. The normal pattern is to run classes of an hour which allows enough time for people to arrive, get settled, actually do the moves (19 in total including standing zen at the end) ...then have time for a quick chat and get out..

The actual set takes between 20 and 30 minutes to do depending on how slowly you do the moves and how many times you repeat each move.

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darrensurrey
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Ah right. I run a couple of sessions at a cancer centre. I find 45 minutes is more than enough as similarly the exercises take about 30 minutes and then I have to fill another 15 minutes with relevant explanations and other random tai chi-related stuff. πŸ˜€

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Reiki Pixie
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This should be of interest:

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