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McTimoney chiropractor


happygirl
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Hi,

I'm not sure if I've put this post into the right section or not but someone at work mentioned about McTimoney chiroprators (not sure if this is how you spell it).

Is it similar to the usual chiropractic methods and what exactly is it ? Someone suggsted it to me because of my tight muscles but I've been told there's nothing wrong with my spine or joints (hence I've never visited a chiropractor) - so is this McTimoney method different ?

Thanks.

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sunanda
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Funny this should come up today, HG, as my own chiropractor mentioned it during my treatment yesterday. I was telling him about the chiropractor I used to go to and he asked if she was McTimoney. When I asked what that meant he demonstrated and explained that it's a kind of noisy, slappy, clappy method of treatment. I'm not sure I can explain it but I recognised it as the method used by the very first chiropractor I'd ever visited. That's as much as I know. But I prefer the way my present therapist treats me.

Ah ha! Just found this site:
Have a look.

xxx

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happygirl
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Thanks for the website Sunanda. Not having "seen" it - it's quite hard to imagine. I don't fancy the slappy, clappy thing you mentioned to be honest and that's probably why you prefer your current chiropractor.

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sportstherapy
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having had lots of chiropractic treatments, paying out a fortune and getting nowhere, I lost faith completely. I stopped treatments and a while later met a McTimoney Chiropractic, who noticed I seemed to be sat awkwardly (to alleviate the pain). She offered to give me a quick treatment, which I accepted, and found the pain relief was immediate.

She also gave me some great advice, which I took, and didnt have problems again, something that my original chiropractor didnt do, he was quite happy just to take my money off me each week!

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Energylz
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Have been to a talk given by a McT. Chiropractor. From what I recall.... typical chiropractors techniques orginate from America and involve a lot of bone cracking type movements (what people usually imagine when you talk about chiropractic treatements) whereas McT. Chiropractics originates from Scotland and involves a more gentle pushing technique rather than bone cracking. The McT. technique involves pushing the joints/spine/whatever, back past the normal alignment and letting it spring back to the normal. There's some reason behind doing it this way, but I can't recall what it was. Apparently the McT. way of practicing comes across a lot less brutal and seemingly more effective. But I guess you'll have to ask people who had the different treatments to get a fair view on that.

All Love and Reiki Hugs

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happygirl
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Have been to a talk given by a McT. Chiropractor. From what I recall.... typical chiropractors techniques orginate from America and involve a lot of bone cracking type movements

Yes - I've never been to a chiropractor but have always imagined that's what it's like and to be honest a bit too "brutal" for me.

At the monet my muscles are OK(ish) but may delve further into this McTimoeny thing if they get worse. I just don't fancy being pulled around really. I went to a physio once (when my normal physio was away) on recommendation of a work colleague. I did have a nagging concern before I went and boy i regretted it. He pulled me around so much i went into shock and had to go to hospital. I then found out he wasn't a Chartered physio (the only ones allowed to practice now) !! So even though i was careful then, I was caught out and so am even more careful now.

Thanks all for your info and stories.

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sunanda
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HG
Just to say that I love my chiropractor! I go every week for 'maintenance' - not because he tells me I have to but because he makes my body feel so good. Sure, his treatment is sometimes a bit ummm....robust - but that way I can feel that he's doing something. And it's always good.

xxx

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sportstherapy
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HG
Just to say that I love my chiropractor! I go every week for 'maintenance' - not because he tells me I have to but because he makes my body feel so good. Sure, his treatment is sometimes a bit ummm....robust - but that way I can feel that he's doing something. And it's always good.

xxx

I think you may need to look at the long term affects of constantly having your joints manipulated, it really isnt good for you.

I am a firm believer that if soft tissue is dysfunctional it will misalign joints, so there is a place for manipulation; when soft tissue has been 'fixed', and the joints are still misaligned, but you tend to find that you dont always need it.

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sunanda
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OK, thanks.

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happygirl
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I think you may need to look at the long term affects of constantly having your joints manipulated, it really isnt good for you.

I am a firm believer that if soft tissue is dysfunctional it will misalign joints, so there is a place for manipulation; when soft tissue has been 'fixed', and the joints are still misaligned, but you tend to find that you dont always need it.

Without wishing to go :offtopic:the physios I use are very good (apart from the idiot i visited by accident who wasn't even a qualified physio) and they've told me that joints should only be manipulated as a last resort. I've been told there are 5 levels of "force" used - from something very light at one end of the scale to manipulation at the other end of the scale. I've only ever been "manipulated" a couple of times in my life - all other visits I've only had work done on the soft tissue. This is perhaps why i've never ventured into visiting a chiropractor - Some who I've been told can be "gung ho" in tackling joints without trying softer, less invasive treatment first.

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sunanda
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I'm going to talk to my chiropractor about this tomorrow. I'm not actually sure what is meant by manipulation. I know he uses a variety of techniques on me including massage and acupuncture. He also does what he calls 'adjustments' when he somehow 'clicks' something in my neck or shoulders for example. Is this manipulation? I trust him 100% so I wonder why he hasn't warned me to stop having treatment. Could it be that the reason I first went to him (RSI and pain in my right shoulder) is still not completely cured? BTW he doesn't do the same things every week - he works on different areas. As I'm 58 and my body is beginning to seize up, I do find it very beneficial and would be reluctant not to have any more treatments.

Edit to say that I spoke to my chiropractor this morning and he agreed that someone who is young and whose joints are loose shouldn't have too much manipulation. However he explained that my spine is quite stiff and a lot of my joints don't stay loose after a treatment but get 'locked'. For this reason regular treatment is necessary for me, while it may not be for a younger person. However, as I am improving, he agreed that I should go to fortnightly appointments rather than weekly ones. He did say that he would have told me if he thought it would not be beneficial for me to continue being treated and I do believe him.

xxx

xxx

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happygirl
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Hi Sunanda,

Glad you got some further info.

As I said - the only info I've been told is that manipulation should only be used as a last resort and only when strictly necessary. I guess joints do get stiffer as you get older - but I do know pensioners who visit the physio I go to and they don't have any manipulation done - that said they may have different problems from you. I'm hoping to see my physio on Saturday so, if I do, I'll ask him about it again. In my whole life I've had manipulation done twice by this physio (both times on my neck - once as a teenager and once several years ago).

However when I visited the non qualified physio when my normal physio was away on holiday - (btw - you can only call yourself a physiotherapist only if you're a Chartered physiotherapist but others do practice physiotherapy by giving themselves different titles - thus finding a legal loophole) who proceeded to manipulate everything in sight. My body went into shock afterwards (and I ended up in hospital) through this unnecessary pulling around of my body - so I'm obviously wary of people who manipulate far too often. My body reacted to all this unneccesary manipulation by reacting the same way as someone who had been beaten up or mugged and it simply went into a shock mode. My usual physio was horrified by what this idiot had done but there was no legal comeback as in British law there are loopholes and non-Chartered physios do get round the law by calling themselves therapists (which is legal and can mean anything) or some equally vague title.

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sunanda
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Hi HG

Not sure but I guess there must be a difference between a physiotherapist and a chiropractor? Anyway, of course we're all difference and what's good for one may not be so for another. I've had three chiropractors altogether and this one is the one I like best (it helps that we get on like a house on fire and natter to each other all through the treatments!) The first one was (I think) a McTimoney one and (I think now) not very good. The middle one was a lovely woman who was very gentle. I went to her for a specific problem which she helped with and which hasn't returned. I went to the current one because of another problem and he's almost sorted that, but I'm happy just to go on seeing him for 'maintenance'. I know my next door neighbour swears by her osteopath. Horses for courses. It's shocking though the harm that unqualified people can do: no wonder you don't want to be manipulated any more!

xxx

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sportstherapy
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I think anyone reading this should be aware that there are very very very few courses in the UK that cover the high velocity manipulations, that are usually taught at University.

I have however, come across quite a few therapists who attempt manipulations without training. Usually these are people who work alongside chiros and osteopaths, who 'show' them the techniques.

I have reported one such person, who was 'taught' by her chiro/osteopath, and fortunately she is no longer practising, after her insurance and professional membership were cancelled.

High velocity manips can be very dangerous indeed, as happygirl can confirm. Neck manipulations can cause strokes, and even death, even when carried out by fully trained professionals.

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happygirl
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I have to apologise. I saw my physio on Saturday to pay my bill but as he was in a rush - i didn't get a chance to ask him further questions on manipulation. Sorry. Will ask him if I have to go and see him again.

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