can asthma leave yo...
 
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can asthma leave you?


Jocky
Posts: 48
Topic starter
(@jocky)
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Joined: 11 years ago

hi guys, looking for some info. i was diagnosed with asthma at age 21 i'm now 29, at first i would be breathless just running up stairs in the house. at that time i wasn't very active and unemployed. so went to the docs and only managed to blow 500 on the peak flow meter. since then i've been employed and take great care of my diet and exercise with weights regurarly, im 6ft and weigh 240 lbs with not much body fat now, went to my asthma doc last week and blew 800 on the peak flow, she has said i should stop with the inhalers now as i no longer have asthma. is that possible??

thanks jocky

14 Replies
sunanda
Posts: 7639
(@sunanda)
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Joined: 19 years ago

Is it possible? Why not? Great news. Bet you're pleased.

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Energylz
Posts: 16599
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Joined: 18 years ago

Hi Jocky,

Yes, it's possible. Some people 'grow out of it', whilst others can change environments and find the triggers are no longer around them (my other half suffered badly when we lived in a flat together, and it's only when we moved to a new house, that we realised just how damp the flat had been and how the mould spores must have been effecting her; within just a few days, she was feeling so much better).

If your doctor says that you no longer need the inhalers then that's great news. Of course it's probably wise to keep one handy just in case in the short-medium term, and see how you get on.

All Love and Reiki Hugs

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Jocky
Posts: 48
Topic starter
(@jocky)
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Joined: 11 years ago

hi guys, yup i'm pretty stoked about it, but something in my mind tells me i should keep taking them, maybe because i've been taking them so long, i dont know. i'll probably keep one on me at all times just in case : )

take care

jocky

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Gussie
Posts: 3506
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Joined: 19 years ago

It can indeed go and it can stay gone too. Best advice I can give is to ensure you are always well hydrated as this seems to be the best way to keep it at bay. Congratulations!

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Amelia Jane
Posts: 11613
(@amelia-jane)
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Joined: 18 years ago

I can say from experience that it can go, my son was diagnosed with asthma when he was about 4, he's now 13, a month or so ago he pulled a sicky to get out of school and faked 'big time' that he could hardly breath...so being overly concerned (and highly gullable) I took him to see the doctor straight away who ran tests on him and told me that theres no longer any sign of asthma...I'd kinda figured my son was bluffing as he was grinning from ear to ear come 9.10am... :rolleyes:lol xxx

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Louisa
Posts: 1178
(@louisa_1611053138)
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Joined: 15 years ago

Hiya, how lovely 🙂

I was born with bronchial asthma and have had to rely on meds, without modern meds I would not of lived.

Over the years I have seen much improvement with medication and have witnessed the 'seven year cycle' with some people.

It never happened for me but it's all I have known, so it's just a part of me now.

Best wishes.

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butterflywings
Posts: 469
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Joined: 15 years ago

In my experience it can go or rather it can change.

I had full blown asthma from 6months to 10years and then it stopped. As a teenager I started to get hay fever but then as an adult I got a cough after camping in the everglades which wouldn't go. Eventually diagnosed as allergy asthma.

The allergy asthma has been on and off depending on where I've been living. I know the triggers and if I am careful it is under control.

Chest xrays a few years ago showed no sign of asthma now, allergy asthma is apparently quiet different and can simply be brought on by allergens.

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sandi
Posts: 6
(@sandi)
Active Member
Joined: 11 years ago

Asthma in adulthood can somehow lay low and one does not have any particular problems because of it. Otherwise, this is a disease that can be a serious attitude to handle it perfectly, even with the help of modern medicines.

Great news for you !!!!

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Fudge
Posts: 488
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Joined: 14 years ago

Lifestyle, foods, environment, general wellbeing, all have an impact on ones health, etc, etc,

Years ago there was a guy from Eastern Europe (cant remember exactly where/when) who 'taught' people to 'breath properly' and not rely on their inhalers. My son suffered from bad excema and one day we came home from the doctors with an inhaler, it did help as he was full of coughs/cold sort of ongoing. My aunt watched this guy on TV and practiced the breathing exercises and didnt use her inhalers for many years, only in her 80's did she started using them again (but I suspect she still only uses them when she gets a cough/cold).

In a nutshell, it was all in the breathing techniques. I recall my aunt telling my son how to 'breath' and hold, then breath again, counting and holding, etc, after a few weeks she said for him to start 'just doing star jumps' a few at a time, breathing as she taught him, he was only around three years of age (now 18) and I asked him how he feels, he said he felt like he had just taken his inhaler and could breath easy. Over a matter of 6 weeks he reduced his inhaler and we never needed another one, although the GP kept asking if he was using his, then he did the tests and said, mmmmmmmmmm and didnt give us another prescription!

Just thought I would share our experience, but if anyone knows who this is and if the technique has been followed up, I would be interested. As far as I can make out the breathing exercises encouraged the individual to breath deeply & hold, then exhale gentle.

Imagine a piece of brocoli with the smallest part at the end's sort of 'stuck together' with mucus:( Asthma suffererss breath very shallow into the mucus, which doesnt expand/contract. Teaching the individual to breath will help expand the lung capacity, and hopefully 're-inflate' the ends of the brocoli! (yep simple terms but understandable)

Years ago, people with asthma were told to rest and dont do much, but nowadays exercise is encouraged.

Just the ramblings of me

Fudge

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CarolineN
Posts: 4760
(@carolinen)
Famed Member
Joined: 13 years ago

Lifestyle, foods, environment, general wellbeing, all have an impact on ones health, etc, etc,

Years ago there was a guy from Eastern Europe (cant remember exactly where/when) who 'taught' people to 'breath properly' and not rely on their inhalers. My son suffered from bad excema and one day we came home from the doctors with an inhaler, it did help as he was full of coughs/cold sort of ongoing. My aunt watched this guy on TV and practiced the breathing exercises and didnt use her inhalers for many years, only in her 80's did she started using them again (but I suspect she still only uses them when she gets a cough/cold).

In a nutshell, it was all in the breathing techniques. I recall my aunt telling my son how to 'breath' and hold, then breath again, counting and holding, etc, after a few weeks she said for him to start 'just doing star jumps' a few at a time, breathing as she taught him, he was only around three years of age (now 18) and I asked him how he feels, he said he felt like he had just taken his inhaler and could breath easy. Over a matter of 6 weeks he reduced his inhaler and we never needed another one, although the GP kept asking if he was using his, then he did the tests and said, mmmmmmmmmm and didnt give us another prescription!

Just thought I would share our experience, but if anyone knows who this is and if the technique has been followed up, I would be interested. As far as I can make out the breathing exercises encouraged the individual to breath deeply & hold, then exhale gentle.

Imagine a piece of brocoli with the smallest part at the end's sort of 'stuck together' with mucus:( Asthma suffererss breath very shallow into the mucus, which doesnt expand/contract. Teaching the individual to breath will help expand the lung capacity, and hopefully 're-inflate' the ends of the brocoli! (yep simple terms but understandable)

Years ago, people with asthma were told to rest and dont do much, but nowadays exercise is encouraged.

Just the ramblings of me

Fudge

Hi Fudge

A excellent story! 😀

Was the breathing technique anything to do with [url]this one[/url]? In fact if you put 'breathing techniques' into google quite a few come up but this is one that caught my eye in the past, tho I was more interested in stress reduction. There's a here.

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BreathingRemed
Posts: 23
(@breathingremed)
Eminent Member
Joined: 11 years ago

Buteyko: Natural control of asthma allergies anxiety and sleep

Yes this would have been Dr Konstantin Buteyko.

The Buteyko Breathing Method has been in the UK Asthma guidelines since 2008 (British Thoracic Society).

Just search on the internet for more info.

Janet

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healthuk
Posts: 11
(@healthuk)
Active Member
Joined: 13 years ago

Through personal experience, the asthma symptoms can improve. I think it greatly depends on triggers though.

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chakraman
Posts: 67
(@chakraman)
Trusted Member
Joined: 12 years ago

i was on ventolin full strength four times a day for 8 years. i changed my diet starting nose breathing, decreased my medication to half a blister each time (doc wouldn't reduce it so i did it myself but of course don't recommend doing that), but it wasn't till i had an acupuncture appointment, i'd been having them for tennis elbow which it sorted, that my asthma went completely.

i told the acupuncturist what i was trying to do so she did some lung points et voila...it has never retruned, even if i didn't look after my diet etc. it was 3 days gone before i realised i hadn't needed to reach for the inhaler. 1 week later i went to the dentist, had a mercury filling placed, and had full blown m.e./cfs by the next day. that was 13 years ago, but still so glad to have gotten rid of being on medication daily as i don't think that fact was doing me any favours...

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johnnyboy2342
Posts: 1
(@johnnyboy2342)
New Member
Joined: 9 years ago

Wow I sure do hope mine leaves me! 😀

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