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Plantar Fasciitis help


Iceni
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(@iceni)
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Joined: 19 years ago

Has anyone got any tips for treating this painful condition. I'm treating (reflexology, acupressure) someone who is going on a walking holiday in 6 weeks. Massaged it well with ibuprofen cream. It has seemed to have developed into a heel spur.
He has had osteopathy, ultrasound and PSW to no avail.

Iceni

8 Replies
candie
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RE: Plantar Fasciitis help

Do you combine ibuprofen cream with your treatments? Sorry, maybe I am reading it wrong? Wouldn't it be better to use a natural anti-inflammatory? The two things don't seem to mix what with all the damage that brufen can do.[&:]

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Sulis
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RE: Plantar Fasciitis help

I agree with Candie about the ibruprofen cream. Since reflexologists aren't supposed to prescribe I think you're on shaky ground there.

I had a client with a heel spur as one of my case studies when I was training. I'd advise frequent treatments, start quite gently massaging around the painful area and work up to more pressure actually on the spur. I managed to break down my clients heel spur but it took quite a bit of doing.

The other thing you could do is put them onto a good chiropodist / podiatrist. I think that may be your best bet since you have limited time.

Love and light

Sulis xx

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Aromababe
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RE: Plantar Fasciitis help

I used to have this condition and it is really painful, often caused by flat feet. You should recommend that your client sees a podiatrist and has a biomechanical assessment. He will probably need orthotics fitted, so needs to do it soon and definitely before his holiday.

Lesley

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greatruaha
Posts: 24
(@greatruaha)
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Joined: 19 years ago

RE: Plantar Fasciitis help

I suffered from this condition for two years. One thing that did help was firm rubber heel cushions that I got in a shop that sold sports trainers . It was eventually healed by Reiki, was quite a miracle for me as I had never even heard of Reiki at that point. One session and it was gone, never suffered from it again.

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Anahata
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RE: Plantar Fasciitis help

Plantar Fasciitis is what it says. Any 'itis' means there's inflammation present, whether it be a joint in arthritis or the tonsils in tonsilitis. So the same applies with the fascia in fasciitis. [:@]

Fascia is another word for the collagen based connective tissue, that physically holds us together. The sheafing around the muscles (the tough chew bits in a steak or pork chop) & other organs (including bones), ligaments, tendons, etc.

It is of critical importance because, in addition to holding us together all organs form in fascia, are protected by & held together by it. Amongst osteopaths, there is even a fascia appreciation society - weird folks I know! [sm=rollaugh.gif] But you do see our point.

The significance of the plantar fascia is that it supports the main arch of the foot & if this start to collapse, then the attachment to the heel bone starts to get pulled away. The bone tries to compensate for the 'skin' (periostium) being pulled away from it by producing more bone to fill the space. Hence the formation of a spur.

The good news is that these do resolve, sometimes spontaniously, but they usually need some help. 😮

Pharmaceutical anti-inflammatories, such as Ibuprofen & collectively known as NSAID's block the inflammatory process, which is a large part of the healing process. So it's difficult to see how this would help other than to relieve the immediate symptom of pain in the short term. [:-]

Natural anti-inflammatories ( you'll need to ask an aromtherapist about these, but premade preparations from the health food shop would include ie Deep Heat, Gonne Balm, Tiger Balm & Firey Jack) that work by dilating the blood vessels & stimulating local circulation tend to fair better. These don't block the inflammatory process, instead they improve the circulation to & drainage from the area. 😉

Also, bear in mind that the skin on the sole of the foot is thicker than any where else. 😮

Another way of improving circulation is hot & cold. 3/4 fill a plastic pop bottle & throw in the freezer. Then this can be rolled under foot (with a thin sock or covering so as not to stick to or burn the skin) several times a day to ease pain & get thru the inflammatory phase quicker.

Deep soft tissue work to the plantar (under side) of the foot. [:@]

Addressing an underlying dysfunction of associated areas like the mechanics of the mid, hind foot, ankle knee, etc, as an osteopath would look for. 😉

Acupuncture could be considered, which usually a lot less painful than a cortizone injection to the area that some GPs offer & most can refer for. [:o]

There's an off the shelf orthotic that should help called - Orthaheel - these are likely to fiar better than just a simple heel cushion as they support the main arch of the foot & help correct the angle of the heel bone. They also have a softer pressure relief spot for the heel spur if present. 😉

Nutritional supplemements that in theory should help:-

Dr Joel Wallach, the mineral guru, recons that heel spurs are caused by a lack of calcium. That would need to be an organic form of calcium - not the commonly used form - calcium carbonate!

Also, I should add that supplementing calcium (Ca), if there is an intolerance to Ca could be ineffectual or actually aggravate the problem see NAET website below.

CoQ10 - whilst fascia is largely collegen based it does have contractile cells, so theoretically this could help. [sm=scratchchin.gif]

As, may any of the collagen supporting supplements, such as, chondroitin, glucosamine sulphate & MSM.

And, indeed any good antioxidants, which are more like to be fast acting, such as your basic vitamin C (see warning about Ca) & the best I know is Revenol - will have more info on that on the Holistic-Centre site some time soon or at least a link. [:o]

The last case of this I treated was actually my dad. It seems to go with the territory, that those closest to us have little idea of what we are about & what we do. When I offered to help he said somethin

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ro§ie
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RE: Plantar Fasciitis help

hi anahata,

i've resurrected this after following the link from painful feet by candy.

i had a reflex client today, recommended to try reflex by her DOCTOR!! <gasp>, so she came to me.

she has a few aches and pains, is 49, peri menopausal. but her feet are a big problem for her. they get *restless* and *painful* more so at bedtime, when they are up in a resting position.

i could see no visible signs of anything but the balls of the feet were quite warm and particularly in line with the middle toe (zone 3). during the session she wriggled the foot not being worked on as this helps. the foot being worked on actually felt cooler too.

at the end though, she flexed her toes and the balls of her feet took on quite a mottled appearance, as if inflammation was present.

i hadnt thought of plantar fasciitis, as i thought that was mainly heel spurs and her heels arent so much of a bother... having said that, where the instep ends and the heel starts was tender (hmmm small intestine, me thinx). she has had blood tests and the doc has looked, would a doctor know it was plantar fasciitis?'

whaddya think? she is coming back next week and i am making a blend of lavender and peppermint to maybe apply at night, but the ice bottle sounds like a good idea to try.

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Anahata
Posts: 1462
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RE: Plantar Fasciitis help

Still sounds like plantar fasciitis. 😉

The plantar fascia runs from the ball of foot (metatarsal heads) & attaches into the heel bone exactly where you describe. It seems that its' pulling the periostium away from the bone causes this the bone to grow more bone to fill this potential space & voila - you have a heel spur. [:@]

You do have to dig deep & in the right place to incriminate these - so good on yer! [sm=dance.gif]

She's wriggling her feet, as the movement will help the inflammation drain away from the area. 🙂

It is quite feasible that her GP may have missed this, so sounds like a good opportunity write a diplomatic letter to GP saying what you suspect this lady's problem is & you have given her 'whatever' treatment & 'whatever' advice, etc.
(Including advising her to return to see them.) 😮

Whether it has helped or you feel it will help or something like - You are prepared to continue treatment for as long as she is benefitting, but would value their opinion on any other options open to them. i.e. advice, referral to a podiatrist, etc. [sm=scratchchin.gif]

As well as helping the lady, this may instill some confidence in the GP & you may get some more referrals out of it, so definately worth doing. 😀

Hope that helps - And.

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akshay ortho
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(@akshay-ortho)
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Joined: 4 years ago

I have plantar fasciitis in both feet. I could feel how comfortable these sneakers were from the moment I put them on - EVEN BEFORE I STOOD UP!!! I could feel the heel of the shoe cuddling my heel. I can not bear to wear anything but my orthofeet shoes! I like the hammer toe for toe comfort. Fit is great. I like the colors and the mesh.

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