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Sulis
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Following on from Clarebear's 'I want to train as a reflexologist' thread; what do you lot all think of the term 'clinical reflexology'?

I've been trained by the IIR which is eqivalent to the AoR qualification (I believe the courses are very similar). I can and do call myself a clinical reflexologist. A clinical reflexologist is trained to work as an independent complimentary medical practitioner with both ill and well people. We are trained to work with people who suffer from diseases which many reflexologists seem to treat as contraindications to reflexology - cancer, epilepsy, heart disease etc (you get the picture)
Clinical reflexology is seen as more than a relaxation therapy.

I'm being devils advocate here, I have never had a reflexology treatment from someone who was trained with VCTC or ITEC. Is there a difference? My course tutors said there is but from reading the threads from therapists here I'm now not so sure.

Please enlighten me.

Love and light

Sulis xx
)O(

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ro§ie
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

interesting ideas. i saw you describe yourself as a clinical reflexologist in the other thread and i did wonder then what the difference was.

i am ITEC trained and i believe that my training was covering me to treat ill people; was certainly never given the impression that i am solely(hehe!) there to treat well people and just give relaxation.

however, in training you do start to wonder because so many things appear on the CI list, or the treat with doctors consent or with caution. sometimes i think its wrong to be taught the CI's as if you then *never* treat such cases... and unfortunately, as there seems so much else to cover, one never really gets to the bottom of it.

i guess specific treatments were not taught for heart conditions, cancer or epilepsy (to name the things you mentioned) and in experience, one does not always come across those cases. i've done further training to treat pregnancy with confidence and i would imagine those cases you mention can also have treatments... the general rule being go gently and do a complete treatment, as one would anyway.

however, its easy to have a confidence knock and question what you are doing. cancer being one of the more common questionables of whether to treat or not... can reflexology do harm and why/ how? as you have had training in this area, what is the answer to this?

was your training described as clinical reflexology? i often wonder what advanced reflexology teaches. so many courses/ names to choose from...

but, to sum up... no i am not trained in *clinical* reflexology but i certainly do more than a relaxation treatment.

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Susan52
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

I'm glad Sulis brought this up as I have often wondered why people call themselves 'clinical' Reflexologists. I am VTCT trained and we were certainly taught that you could give treatments to 'ill' people, that's what it mostly all about isn't it. Although we were told that you're not really supposed to say that you are treating a specific ailment as Reflexology is holistic and treats the whole person and in this way helps the body to heal itself, although I do treat people with specific ailments all the time. Of course, we were taught about conraindications the main ones of which were, Thrombosis, Pregnancy (first 3 months) and Cancer but we were taught that every case is individual and must be dealt with considering all the angles.

During my training we certainly did cover quite a lot on different types of illnesses and diseases which affect all the systems of the body and how these would effect the application of a Reflexology treatment and vice versa.

I certainly would not consider myself as a 'medical practitioner' as I think that it may give the impression of being a doctor, although I would agree with the 'complementary practitioner' or 'therapist'.

I was just assuming that to gain the title of 'clinical Reflexologist' you would have to have gained some other training first. Since there is no regulation yet though I guess it's up to the therapist what they call themselves.

Rosie,, could you please tell me what sort of things you were taught on your 'pregancy' course as I am interested in this as I have two clients trying to conceive at the moment one of whom has already had two miscarriages. By the way I didn't treat her during the two pregnancies, (we both agreed to stop the treatments) but I often wonder what would have happened if I had. Would it have helped her carry full term? Who knows?

I better go before I write a book here!!!!:D

luv Susan

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candie
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

I agree with all above. I trained with ITEC (both in aromatherapy and reflexology) and have clients that are well and unwell. I have worked with cancer patients and am not afraid of treating people with 'contra-indications'. One client told me the other day that her friend went for Indian head massage and the therapist told her that she couldn't treat her as she had high blood pressure! Worse, she sent her to her doctor and the doctor said she wasn't allowed to have the treatment! What tosh.

It is my understanding that the 'clinical' term may have come from medically trained people who took reflexology courses and it has kinda stuck. I have worked alongside 'clinical' aromatherapists and I can't honestly say that they do anything differently or get different results. I have also worked alongside therapists who are terrified to treat anybody, pregnant women, people on medication, cancer, diabetes etc etc.

As said above, it is all unregulated anyway so a bit puzzling really.:D

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candie
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

I agree with all above. I trained with ITEC (both in aromatherapy and reflexology) and have clients that are well and unwell. I have worked with cancer patients and am not afraid of treating people with 'contra-indications'. One client told me the other day that her friend went for Indian head massage and the therapist told her that she couldn't treat her as she had high blood pressure! Worse, she sent her to her doctor and the doctor said she wasn't allowed to have the treatment! What tosh.

It is my understanding that the 'clinical' term may have come from medically trained people who took reflexology courses and it has kinda stuck. I have worked alongside 'clinical' aromatherapists and I can't honestly say that they do anything differently or get different results. I have also worked alongside therapists who are terrified to treat anybody, pregnant women, people on medication, cancer, diabetes etc etc.

As said above, it is all unregulated anyway so a bit puzzling really.:D

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ro§ie
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

hi susan,

apart from anything, the extra training gave me total confidence in treating pregnancy, pre conception right through.

i think you were probably right not to treat during early pregnancy on this particular lady... in some ways more of a protection for yourself... if she miscarried again, its possible the blame would be laid at your door. however, be assured that a *viable* pregnancy is no way going to shift due to a reflexology treatment. if miscarriage occurs, it would have done anyway... BUT you can be there when the client is ready for treatments, to give an ear and support.

other than the very obvious CI's, you only dont treat if you dont want to or they dont want you to... simple, eh.

BUT i also think the further training was invaluable as there are some points to avoid, not necessarily ones we learn in a general treatment but TCM that when stimulated can increase the energy and expedite labour... useful when EDD is reached and beyond.

i also learnt other techniques i hadnt been shown before, that i include in general treatments... endocrine balance and lymph drainage being my 2 faves.

oooops, gotta go.... need to be at a new PC client now!!

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waywood
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

Hi Sulis

I too use the term clinical reflexologist - more to differentiate myself from the beauty shops that offer 'reflexology massage'. I do specialise in treating specific conditions and I guess it's just my way of making my treatments sound more apropriate, rather than just a nice foot rub.

Health & happiness

Waywood

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Prerana
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

Helloooooo just trying to catch up with posts after a well earned break with the family 😉
& this is the 1st one I've read . .

Hi Lesley, Hi Candie etc etc hope you're all healthy & happy
. . .its odd that whilst on holiday one can actually miss reading all teh wonderful posts & info on HP !! How sad is that ! 🙂

Anyway digression ( as always 🙂 . .

Clinical Reflexology - hmmn I've often wondered the difference too ,
i did a two year course & my college was a Clinical Reflexology College.
I think I mentioned a few years ago ( some may remember ) that i used to find the case studies & consultation forms very long ...23 pages . . . !!
all was very clinically orientated.. ie each reflex worked we had to specify why anatomically & physiologically we were working those reflexes ( as well as understand in principle holistically, subtle energy applications etc etc )
Mainly we combined each case study with the medical background of the application,
reason why we were working eg liver, thyroid etc what hormones etc were stimulated & why.
Length of time stimulated etc responses during after etc.
Diagrams & responses were also noted each week as were the reflex response & time
gaged on a scale of 1-5,
1 being no pain 5 being OWCH !!
:0
thus we, could define which reflex were out of balance which then could detrmine holistically the imbalanced areas which may affect other organs etc etc that doesnt usually associate with the presenting disorder . . . . ie stomach , headache - digestive problems ..etc
We also had to work alongside/with Dr's- writing letters to consultants / Dr's discussing findings if necessary & asking queries or even permission etc to treat..or advise client wishes to go ahead although Dr hasnt given permission etc..

WE sat 2 exams, a basic AOR one & the College's one which was severley A&P orientated & every month did huge test papers on all systems - I break out in a sweat thinking about it 😀

And sorry potential reflexologist - No the college isnt taking on any more students . .it was a private college & the proprieter after many many years working her own clinic, & running the college - decided after our group that she was closing & retiring.
Hmmn it wasnt my fault really 🙂
She very much included the Eunice Ingham teaching method..& Hanne Marquredt...we also had to learn many ways of applying pressure- circular, hooking, kneading,etc tec knuckles so our thumbs & fingers & joints didnt become too sore or worn out..

Hmmm think I'm writing a book too 🙂

Warming Feet Rubs to you all . ..

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Prerana
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

PS - we then had to do a year probationary before we became a fully fledged Clinical Reflexologist . .

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candie
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

And it sounds great! Hiya Pauline! Nice to have you back.

I think it just goes to show, if you have a great teacher then you are very lucky. Sadly, the standards in teaching can be very poor and you don't always know what you are getting.

Roll on regulation, that's what I say!:D

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ro§ie
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

hi david,

i'll reply onto your one, simply because it fits better here but my answer is sort of encompassing prerana's detailed reply.

our training very much had lots of A & P, what reflexes and why, emotional signs on feet (lines/ colours etc) nails, hooking, knuckling and hand reflexology. however, i dont think we were as detailed as yours.

going back to david now, yes, i do believe there is a difference in the reflexology we learn as a stand alone course (and massage for that matter) compared to what is taught as an *add on* during beauty therapy courses, whether NVQ3 or ITEC/ VTCT. please dont jump on me beauty therapists, as this is just my opinion.

during a reflexology treatment at a health place i do stuff at sometimes, i was asked if a student (NVQ) could sit in and see, as she herself was doing reflex as part of her training. as far as i understood, she had nearly finished her training. so i do my thing and explain to the client about crystals and the treatment etc. after the client had gone, the student asked me about crystals, i explained and she said *oh thats what it is, i didnt know*! to me, the crystals are the most fundamental part of reflexology so i was pretty amazed she didnt know.

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Prerana
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

Hi Candie .. Thank you its Nice to be back 🙂
Yes i agree regulations are desperatly needed what really annoys me is there seems to be none for the colleges, as though anyone whos been a Reflexologist for a couple of years after a while can put a group together buy a package of teaching material from another Reflexologist group & there you have a college ...its all seems to be a money making racket ! G r r r r
Ooh dont get me started . .as the saying goes...
You know one of my friends said to me ooh Im doing reflexology ..Im training every Sat or i can go on a monday til July . . but her tutor is an aromatherapist ( fabulous one at that ) who trained in Reflexology years & years ago but doesnt /has never practiced it.
My friend has practiced on me & i ws trying to help her with all the info she hasnt go
- but its disgraceful - she should have all the knowledge support & info she needs.
that this tutor can apply to teach the subject . . yet hasnt had a clinic etc or worked in the reflexology field at all to me is unbelievable & shes not the only one.
I think tutors should have a minimum of 5 years clinical experience as its when the real learning begins knowledge is developed & expereince instinctively supports all that was learned from the books !!! The feeling beneath teh skin is where we learn most...our sensitivity to what we feel tells us soo much.

Sorry I wil have perhaps rattled cages I know...but there is no offence meant personally to anyone..I'm off loading opinions ..mine ...

I also recall meeting a fellow student years ago at a swimming pool & she said her A&P certificate was handed to her after she basically went to a London hospital..was shown around A&P training rooms ... A day in a trainign rooom !!! . .she said to me in the exam she was asked what Subtle Energy was..she said shed never heard of it .. she failed her exam so did most of her class.. the teaching standards were appalling & this was in London & then ,..which is nearly 5 years ago ..she paid over 1,500 pounds.

OOoh shall i get off my high horse . .. . mmn maybe :D....
The AOR is just like any organisation . .they are trying to regulate but they also are a business, Years ago all th foremembers of the AOR were all reflexologists ..all the famous ones now who have branched off & set up their own schools... but back then they all worked together voluntarily - then copyright came into it..Dwight Byers...so no charts from then on could be the same as his . .etc tec
now the AOR most members & director are paid.. its employed work & the Clinical element which was sooo prominent years ago . . working for Higher recognition within the medical profession seems to have changed. We'll have to waitr & see but i know many of the old school have left due to teh changes. However as a memebr of teh AOR I am looking forward very much to see which direction we are going...I certainly know which direction I am going - and as long as I work hard , study hard & know my work I dont care which governing body i write my cheque out to or belong to as long as i can do my work without having to train to be anything other than what i do.

To be able to chuck out a zillion Reflexologists from a zillion & one different schools doesnt do the profession any good.
Ooooooh give me the regulation job anyday i'll sort the wood from the ..OOh I am going on a bit...hmmn

Objectives should be the same, standards should be the same
In Germany only Medical Practitioners can train to be Reflexologists .
.there they needent question the difference between Clinical or Not. Neither should we !

Boots made BIG mistake jumping onto the Holistic Bandwagon
I was questioning who was going to employ the reflexologists..I mean who had the authority & knowledge to understand or gage the qualifications . . who then would make sure ensure teh clients were happy...only by the books could they see if profit was being made but what about many customers who could be put off for life becasue they has a nice foot massage & just didnt get the

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ro§ie
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

whoa!!! and so early too!! ;o)

i think we all feel very strongly about our professions and what *the governing bosies, whoever ther are* want to do to us. i guess we need to do as you suggest... work hard with best intentions, in what we do, and give the best of what we have.

funnily enough, i thought the boots thing might have been good... afterall, if boots recognised us, maybe the public would too. but what you also say is true, if someone gets an iffy treatment, it does us no good.

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Sulis
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

Thanks for all of your replies. I totally agree with you all, IMO regulation is badly needed. Rosie thanks for clearing up the bit about the beauty therapy courses, I had no idea that reflexology is taught as an add on to these courses. I think that these people are the ones my tutors have been referring to when they talk of a 'different type of reflexology' and not those who are ITEC and VCTC trained _ I believe that these organisations are now part of the Reflexology Forum.
To answer your other question Rosie, the course which I did wasn't titled 'Clinical Reflexology' but throughout the course we were told that that's what it was.
The course which I did with the IIR is designed by the famous (or infamous;)) Dwight Byers and sounds very much like the course which Pre did although mine only took a year.

Love and light

Sulis xx

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Prerana
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

tee heee Rosie .... and breathe...
yes it was rather early wasnt it ;O still...we have to be passionate as teh governing bodies arent ! 😉
Hi Sulis....
Please could you remind me of the whereabouts the Sussanne Enzer course is that you are going to.. I have heard of one in Dorking & Cornwall.

Warming Feet Rubs to us all . . .

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Sulis
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

Hi Pre, the Susanne Enzer course which I'm going to is in Preston on 23rd and 24th May. It's in 2 parts, you do part one and then 6 months and a few case studies later you do part 2. It looks like a really interesting course. Drop me a PM if you want some info on how to get in touch with Susanne Enzer, she seems like a very helpful lady.

Love and light

Sulis xx

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Prerana
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

Hi Sulis...Thank you but I have been in touch with her as I cant do Cornwall & would rather do Kent than Dorking..so once she arrives in the UK we'll be in touch...Thanks for your help. ( Shes on an aeroplane on route from Australiaat the mo )

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candie
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

Ha ha! Boy did that stoke HER up! It is so nice to have a bit of lively debate and you have been MISSED Pre!:D

I agree with you about the teaching. I worked with a VTCT Holistic Therapies Tutor who had never worked outside the college, had NO clients and got no repeat clients where we worked. I was horrified that this was the standard of teaching in the local area and actually went out of my way to do another reflex course rather than learn where she taught. I drove to Manchester from the Wirral each week just to avoid it! Basically she had done the VTCT course and the college found out that she had her adult teaching certificate, were desperate for tutors and gave her the job! Agree with the five year thingie. It's just not fair on students to have tutors who don't have a clue what they are talking about.

I miss my lovely aromatherapy Tutor and his wealth of knowledge, his lovely soul, his warm smile, his patient acceptance of girlie dramas, his long hair and bushy beard! What a honey.:)

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waywood
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RE: Clinical reflexology?

Hi again

Wow! fantastic debate - I want to hopefully shed some light on a couple of bits...

As some of you know, I'm an ITEC lecturer. So far, ITEC have never met me, never had any of my course files and have not asked for any lesson plans etc. As far as I know, ITEC also only ask that you have been in practice for 2 years before you start teaching. The college I'm working for was so desperate to get a trained lecturer, as the course was full and they had no-one qualified to teach! I was the only one they knew of that was available.

I'm also wanting to become an AoR tutor, and this is what I've been told I have to do...
Minimum 5 years practicing before you can register (you can be an assistant tutor after 3 years)
A series of forms (about 20 pages) has to be submitted, detailing your qualifications, experience. Also lesson plans, teaching handouts etc. have to be submitted at this stage (very comprehensive).
You will be interviewed, and also the site where you propose to teach from will be inspected to ensure it is fit for purpose.
Assuming all the criteria has been met, you will be provisionally given the go-ahead to open for business - but, will be monitered and assessed throughout the first year.
At the end of the first year, you are assessed again. If all the criteria are not met, you have to have another provisional year, and rectify the problem areas. If all the criteria are met after the first years assessment, then the school is verified by the AoR.

There is also a BIG difference in the exam formatting - ITEC run a 'closed shop' - they set their own exams and also mark them themselves, therefore there is no indipendence in the qualification (the exam is also multi-choice, so they give you the answer!)
AoR use the AQA exam body to set and mark the exam paper. It is also a paper that does not use the multi-choice format, so askes the student to show that they have synthesised the information and can demonstrate and aply the knowlege they have been taught. This is what gives the AoR that 'edge' over ITEC (and baybe VTCT - I don't know too much about VTCT) as there can never be the accusation that the AoR set thet pass rate of their exam a bit lower, to get more members.

Pre.... wish I'd been to your college, sounds a fantastic training!:)

Health & happiness

Waywood

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manulike
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clinical reflexolgy and the CNHC register

Nice topic, which am happy to resurrect.
I too use the name clinical reflexologist, mainly to differentiate myself from the spa/beauty foot massage people.
Hopefully, the new CNHC registration will gain favour and public appeal.
I have already gained half a dozen refferals from GPs who advised their patients to only use practitioners on the register.
Its not huge - but its a start.

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angelat
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Its Complementary with an EEEE!

Hi Sulis,
A clinical reflexologist is trained to be a complementary medical practitioner with an 'e' not a complimentary practitioner with an 'i'. I think its more important to be able to tell the difference between the two spellings before we start worrying about whether we're 'clinical' or not. There's no such thing as a 'complimentary' reflexologist of any type, clinical or otherwise.
I know I posted this comment on a thread we were both on before and it does massively bug me that lots of therapists seem unable to differentiate between the two as it hardly inspires confidence. If we want to be taken seriously surely we need at least to be able to get the spelling of our profession correct??

Angela

[url]Reflexology in the City of London and Central London | Mobile Reflexologist[/url]

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Jinx
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Hi Angelat

Feel your pain but don't think Sulis has been on here since 2007 so watch that blood pressure if any more old posts appear complete with spelling mistakes.

Cheers

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angelat
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Thanks Jinx, yes I've just noticed they were very old posts so I won't find out where she lives and go round with a dictionary & a stick...
But if only it were just Sulis! They all need telling so I've put a post in General Discussions.

Angela

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derekgruender
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Hi Sulis,
A clinical reflexologist is trained to be a complementary medical practitioner with an 'e' not a complimentary practitioner with an 'i'. I think its more important to be able to tell the difference between the two spellings before we start worrying about whether we're 'clinical' or not. There's no such thing as a 'complimentary' reflexologist of any type, clinical or otherwise.
I know I posted this comment on a thread we were both on before and it does massively bug me that lots of therapists seem unable to differentiate between the two as it hardly inspires confidence. If we want to be taken seriously surely we need at least to be able to get the spelling of our profession correct??

Angela

[url]Reflexology in the City of London and Central London | Mobile Reflexologist[/url]

I do agree with you, Angela, but before you question the professionalism of (and get massively bugged by) those of us who sometimes spell or type words incorrectly, maybe you should check out your own website? On just a quick scan of your home page I found two errors. In the first paragraph, 'london' should have a capital 'L', and you say, in the penultimate paragraph, that home visits, 'can allow a for greater exchange of healing energy'.

See, we're all human 😉

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angelat
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Oh Derek of course we're all human and of course we all make typos and yes thankyou very much I will check my website, but a typo or two is really not the same as fundamentally not knowing how to spell the name of your profession.
And would you go to a physio who couldn't spell physiotherapy? well would you?

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Kiga
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Angela, I agree with you wholeheartedly, but must take issue with your statement "..there's no such thing as a 'complimentary' reflexologist - of any type...'. If I were reflexologist, I don't see why I couldn't advertise myself as being 'complimentary' - some people might like to have themselves and their feet praised and flattered, it would make them feel good about themselves! 😉

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WildStrawberry
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Angela, I agree with you wholeheartedly, but must take issue with your statement "..there's no such thing as a 'complimentary' reflexologist - of any type...'. If I were reflexologist, I don't see why I couldn't advertise myself as being 'complimentary' - some people might like to have themselves and their feet praised and flattered, it would make them feel good about themselves! 😉

HeeHee - you'd have to be careful with that one Kiga, it could be dangerously on the verge of tipping over into an altogether different kind of therapy......

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derekgruender
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Oh Derek of course we're all human and of course we all make typos and yes thankyou very much I will check my website, but a typo or two is really not the same as fundamentally not knowing how to spell the name of your profession.
And would you go to a physio who couldn't spell physiotherapy? well would you?

In fact I'd never go to a physio, regardless of how good their spelling, since a good massage (however it's spelt!) is usually more effective and far more pleasant to receive.

You are missing my point, but since we have gone way off topic, I'll not continue with it.

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Reiki Pixie
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Clinical Relexology? Holistic Reflexology? Advanced Reflexology? Holistic Therapist? Holistic Massage Therapist? Clincial Aromatherapy? etc etc

All nonsense titles developed by desparate therapists. There is too many labels/titles as there are confusing the public, so we don't need anymore. If you do reflexology, that's reflexology. If you work by/with certain priniciples and techniques, just state that is your literature.

If someone asks me what my living is, I usually say "Massage Therapist"; not "Reflexo-Oriento-Push/Pull-Sportif-Soft Tissue Neuro-Muscular Clinical Facillitator"

😮

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maychang
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I trained as a clinical reflexologist (ITEC) and at the same time the same teacher was also providing cover for reflexology VTCT.

We had more indepth theory to do and had to provide a project on a chosen subject. We sat the same exams.

I don't use the term clinical, I think it would put my clients off.

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