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Can I Charge while training?


squidges
Posts: 28
Topic starter
(@squidges)
Eminent Member
Joined: 11 years ago

Hi Everyone,

Have been reading the boards for the last few weeks and found them so so helpful.

I am currently doing the ITEC holistic massage course and was thinking I would hire the local village hall for a few evenings over the next couple of months. It has a small meeting room which would be ideal to do massage from and I thought I might advertise for clients in the local villages to get as much practice as possible and try and build up a base of potential clients for when I am qualified.

I was wondering if I am I allowed to charge for treatments while I am still a student to cover the costs of hiring the hall etc?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks.

Jo

15 Replies
Kevin Bryden
Posts: 191
(@kevin-bryden)
Estimable Member
Joined: 13 years ago

I would be inclined to only treat family and friends. You hold yourself up to problems otherwise.

I'm sure you are not allowed to charge until you are qualified, your insurance may not allow it either.

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Muddi
Posts: 113
(@muddi)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago

You wouldn't be covered by insurance - at the moment you are covered by college insurance BUT only to treat on college premises under supervision etc..

If somebody were to have a reaction (whether this was down to you or not) they could very easily sue you - not a good thing!

I dont think you can actually charge anyway till your qualified - If you treat friends and family you can ask for 'donations' πŸ˜‰ But to actually hire somewhere and charge is asking for trouble im afraid..

But you should deffo keep the place in mind for when you do qualify, as it could be a great starting block for you! x

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Lynora
Posts: 4251
(@jabba-the-hut)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago

Yes, check with your insurance - I wasn't allowed to charge when I was training (but that was a very long time ago!) as I was deemed 'unqualified' until I had the piece of paper to prove I had passed the course. Also, the village hall committee may not allow you to work/use the space, if you are uninsured.

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Andre7
Posts: 109
(@andre7)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago

If you give treatments to people, whether you are a student, unqualified or qualified therapist you should have an insurance.

I think it is irrelevant if you are charging or giving free treatments. As even highly qualified therapists, giving free treatments must have an insurance if they wish to work in a responsible way to protect themselves and their clients.

I think you could charge for your time, expenses of hire and materials.

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Topic starter
(@squidges)
Eminent Member
Joined: 11 years ago

Thanks everyone for your advice. I do have my own student insurance through the Complementary Therapist Association for my case studies, so I have emailed them to find out if I would be covered for this activity. I did a two week intensive course at college and am now on my own until exams in December to learn and practice as much as possible so am therefore not covered by college insurance.

Thanks again.

Jo

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squidges
Posts: 28
Topic starter
(@squidges)
Eminent Member
Joined: 11 years ago

Hi all,

I have asked my insurance which was through the Complementary Therapists Association, and they said:

'Our policy does not prohibit you from charging to cover your expenses but you should not charge a full rate as if you are qualified. What is important is that your clients are aware that you are not yet qualified and that the premises are suitable for the purpose for which you wish to use them.'

So I think I will be okay.

Thanks all for your help.

Jo πŸ™‚

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Muddi
Posts: 113
(@muddi)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago

ah thats good then! You could maybe put on the consultation form a disclaimer for the client to sign saying something like 'I am aware that (your name) is not yet fully qualified and I am happy to receive the above treatment from them' or words to that affect.
Just looks a bit more professional and there can be no comeback from anyone saying they did not know you were not yet qualified etc, just to cover your own back.

Good luck with it and I hope you gain many future and regular clients from it! πŸ˜‰

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just jag
Posts: 91
(@just-jag_1611053569)
Trusted Member
Joined: 13 years ago

Hi Squidges,

I say be bold and start charging people now! Whilst training. Even if it is only Β£20. When I took my Swedish massage course there was a woman who was charging Β£25 a pop for her case study massages (that was 7 years ago). The rest of us were in quiet admiration of her self belief and confidence, which is what we lacked and what kept us from doing that. We thought we weren't good enough to do that.
Who doesn't want to earn something while they are training - and why shouldn't one? You are still providing a service, and no doubt a relaxing one. Don't even tell clients that you are not yet qualified. No one will care (as long as you give a good massage!). Be bold. The massage business has been a real and constant challenge to my self belief, and it has taught me many great things.

Good luck!

J

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JoJo2504
Posts: 1302
(@jojo2504)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago

Yes definitely, it's your time and products (also you have to be rewarded for typing up those boring bliddy case studies πŸ˜€ ). Just say something like, I am training and the prices reflect this, I used to charge a tenner, (petrol, oil etc) Hope this helps πŸ™‚

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Twohoots
Posts: 177
(@twohoots)
Estimable Member
Joined: 12 years ago

I like your style! I need to toughen up I think!;) When I studied for my Swedish Massage VTCT I did several friends (in fact they were queuing up!) and charged nothing.

One of them gave me a thank you card and a bunch of flowers which was really appreciated.

Now I'm studying for IHM and, again, friends are offering their services.:rolleyes:

Going back a long way, I remember a local woman training in massage and she used to have a donation box and "suggested" a donation of Β£10. She was very confident in her ability too and had no qualms at all about pointing the box out to you and saying "I'm not allowed to charge because I'm not fully qualified but I need to cover the costs of my oils, towels, laundry etc".

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Delighted
Posts: 295
(@delighted)
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Joined: 13 years ago

Personally I think it is a bit cheeky to charge whilst training and so have never done so in the 13 years I have practised/trained in the different therapies I do. My reason is very simple; without the case studies you wouldn't be able to pass in the first place.

If people want to make a donation, great, but I think this 'industry' is already very mercenary.

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Victry77
Posts: 72
(@victry77)
Trusted Member
Joined: 12 years ago

I'm in two minds about charging during training. On one hand, colleges charge for clients to come in & get a treatment by students. My college charges Β£10 for an Aroma massage (which is what I'm currently studying) which I would say is fair as the client is still receiving a full treatment (be it a student or not) & the college are providing use of their oils, equipment & facilities. So, I feel if the training facility charges then there's nothing wrong with you personally requesting a donation to contribute in some small way to your course costs & additional expenses.

OTOH, I do agree with Delighted that without case studies, we wouldn't be able to get through the course & I do feel that my case studies would be doing ME a favour. After all, I am asking for their time & commitment.

So, I'm not sure. I definitely think there is something in the idea of attaching value to what you're doing as people will line up around the block when they think they're getting a freebie but aren't quite as enthusiastic if they have to pay. Funny, though, our tutor did mention that one of the reasons the college charges is because they have a hard time getting people to commit to ongoing free treatments.

I think I will just ask for a small donation from my case studies (maybe Β£3.50 per session) and perhaps just a bit more for single treatments.

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activehealing
Posts: 578
(@activehealing)
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Joined: 15 years ago

I am definitely going to ask for donations for the cost of oils, towels etc as I am on benefits with a young son and can't afford to be forking out for these all the time and not earning anything. My college charges Β£10.00 for clients to come in for massage, so I don't think it's out of order if I ask for a donation of Β£5-10. Especially as I have had extremely good feedback from everyone I have massaged before. I have been massaging people for many years, but am only just going for my qualification.

Donna.

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Ccole
Posts: 134
(@ccole)
Estimable Member
Joined: 13 years ago

I never charged for my reflexology etc but now doing aromatherapy at a different college we have been encouraged to charge to cover expenses empahising that we are students and making sure clients sign disclaimer

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Lavandula
Posts: 561
(@lavandula)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago

When I trained in holistic therapies we weren't allowed to charge. I did see case studies outside of college time which I was covered to do with the college insurance/FHT student insurance. I just treated friends anf family and friends of friends etc. and some of them gave me donations towards treatments or cooked me dinner in return which was lovely.

I am currently training to be a Hypnotherapist and after our 7th month, we are oblidged to start charging a discount rate to clients and we are covered to do this.

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