Which Hot Stones He...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Which Hot Stones Heater?

Page 1 / 2

msveggieme
Posts: 7
Topic starter
(@msveggieme)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago

Hi All.

I'm wondering which hot stones heater to purchase. I work from home and intend buying a 45 basalt stones set. However I am usure of the size of heater I will require. There's a 6 quart (wondering if I'd get 45 stones in this) or an 18 quart (wondering if this would be too large). I have a catlogue in front of me but very hard to judge the sizes. Any help appreciated 🙂

Ms Veggie

33 Replies
Graham
Posts: 493
(@graham_1611053198)
Reputable Member
Joined: 14 years ago

I seem to remember that someone on here is using a slow cooker to heat them up? Would that get them to the required temperature?

Reply
msveggieme
Posts: 7
Topic starter
(@msveggieme)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago

Hi Graham,

I have heard of that too but would really prefer to start with the correct heater. It's just which size that is baffling me!

Ms Veggie.

Reply
Cirrus
Posts: 1547
(@cirrus)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago

Hi msveggieme

I also will be looking for a heater soon. But I will purchase the whole set, which I would assume comes with the correct size heater for the amount of stones provided.
Maybe have a look at the sets and see what size heater comes with the amount of stones you have.

Rx

Reply
Beauty FX
Posts: 25
(@beauty-fx)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago

I seem to remember that someone on here is using a slow cooker to heat them up? Would that get them to the required temperature?

A slow cooker does heat the stones very well... however, it does not regulate the heat and you are forever turning it on and off or taking out the stones to cool... so can be a bit of farf. But if you get the large slow cooker (Argos does them for about £30) you would save a LOT of money. Getting a thermometer would help you so that you know the temp of the stones.

I use a slow cooker (a small one) for heating up my hot hand towels but I decided against the larger one for my stones and opted to buy a stone heater.

Reply
Jay
Posts: 83
 Jay
(@jay)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Stone Heaters

To be honest I use a slow cooker and have done for three years now, I remember it costing me about £20 and I just bought a thermometer, can tend to be on the heavy side however its very robust.
Hope you find what you are looking for.

Jay

Reply
(@cirrus)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago

To be honest I use a slow cooker and have done for three years now, I remember it costing me about £20 and I just bought a thermometer, can tend to be on the heavy side however its very robust.
Hope you find what you are looking for.

Jay

Hi Jay

I would be really interested on how well you can regulate the stone temperature. I know you use a thermometer, so do you just keep switching the cooker off and on? Have you ever had it where the stones are too hot etc etc?

Many thanks

Rx

Reply
Jay
Posts: 83
 Jay
(@jay)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Hi Cirrus - I have three temperature settings on the slow cooker, low, high and auto - I always stick to low - if for some reason the stones feel hotter than normal I have a bowl of cold water and dip the stones in to cool then down. My own theory is if they are too hot to hold then they are too hot to massage with. Never had any problems with them or the heat. If for some reason the client does have contraindications I will generally still use the stone but at a very low temperature, I have been working with the Stones for three years now and cant remember how many massages I have done! A fair few.

Jay

Reply
(@cirrus)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago

Hi Cirrus - I have three temperature settings on the slow cooker, low, high and auto - I always stick to low - if for some reason the stones feel hotter than normal I have a bowl of cold water and dip the stones in to cool then down. My own theory is if they are too hot to hold then they are too hot to massage with. Never had any problems with them or the heat. If for some reason the client does have contraindications I will generally still use the stone but at a very low temperature, I have been working with the Stones for three years now and cant remember how many massages I have done! A fair few.

Jay

Many, many thanks Jay. Food for thought!

Rx

Reply
Jay
Posts: 83
 Jay
(@jay)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago

You're welcome and if all else fails you will be able to make some nice chilli in it!
Jay

Reply
(@cirrus)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago

You're welcome and if all else fails you will be able to make some nice chilli in it!
Jay

Many thanks yet again Jay not sure how the chilli would keep the stones at the best temperature and wouldn't the stones smell a little too? But I'll give it a go and let you know.:dft012:
........................................................................................

Back to the thread.........
Why are there so many kits with varying numbers of stones?
How many stones does a therapist use in one session? Why would you need anymore than this?
With this in mind, how many stones do you recommend to buy in your first kit?

Rx

Reply
ro§ie
Posts: 2898
(@roie-2)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago

i use a slow cooker to heat my stones and have no problems regulating the temperature. get a thermometer and keep an eye on it. the whole point of slow cookers is to maintain a regular heat for cooking.

a friend teaches hot stones and has the proper heaters but finds them very inefficient for maintaining the correct heat.

depending on the size of stone being used, they can transfer their heat very quickly, so even if they are too hot too handle just resting your hands on them for a few seconds and massaging without, soon gets them touchable. (a course will teach you handling techniques).

i cant remember what size my set was, but it included cold marine stones too, a necessity in a treatment. so the 45 could include those... in which case, yeah, i always want more! and, the sets dont always have the size you want to use or that are comfortable in your hands - but you can only find that out by trying.

if you reckon on hot stones, 8 for the back, 4 for each back of leg, 4 for each front, 4 for each arm, hmmm say 2 for abdomen, maybe 6 for head, neck and face and your 8 tiny toe ones (which they probably do include)... then maybe cold stones, 4 for back, 4 each leg, 2 each arm, 3 - 4 face...

having said that, 45 as a first kit would probably do... oh mind you, that may include some big placement stones too...

if you keep a bowl of warm soapy water near the heater, you can always re-use stones... :p

Reply
msveggieme
Posts: 7
Topic starter
(@msveggieme)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago

Seems like most of you use a slow cooker, I'm just wondering what the insurance implications are with that? e.g if someone said the temp was too hot after the treatment yest said it was fine during the massage and one was investigated?........

Also would 45 stones fit in a slow cooker at once and arenlt thy a little narrow and deep?

Ms Veggie.

Reply
Jay
Posts: 83
 Jay
(@jay)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago

Never thought of that -when I trained in hot stone massage we all used the slow cookers. I supose that you demonstrate all the health and safety issues with hot stone massage as with all the other therapies out there are covered and you are aware of the risk there shouldnt be a problem with cover?

I have never been asked by an insurance company, 'how I heat the stones' so if you are in doubt go with your instincts and get the heater for the stones rather than a slow cooker - personally I thought it was a lot of money and a bit of a con, I know of people that clean their stones in their dish washers and when they come out all clean they are at the right temperature for using again - again another bizzare fact of the Hot Stone Massage!

Hope you find what you need etc.

Best wishes
Jay

Reply
 cola
(@cola)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago

Old thread with similar question...

I will add that in the US now, quite a lot of the insurance companies won't cover you for hot stone massage if they are heated over 125degF, about 53degC, they don't care how you are heating the stones, they care about the temp. I think that is a little too cool, 55degC is fine IMO, even up to 60degC is OK if you know what you are doing. UK insurance doesn't require temp regulations (that I know of) but it will probably come in one day.....

As for the size of the heater, it depends on the size of the stones, 45 20cm stones wouldn't fit in a large heater, 45 3cm stones would fit in a smaller heater. If your 45 stones include toes stones, finger stones, facial stones, all the cheap small stones, a small heater would probably be OK, but it depends on your stones.

I work with up 100 hot and cold stones - about 70 hot & 30 cold, and I use some BIG stones, if I used a slow cooker, I'd need more than one.

Reply
hemelgirl
Posts: 758
(@hemelgirl)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago

I have just discovered a reason NOT to use a slow cooker - I was cleaning my stones and one slipped out of my hands into my slow cooker which I happen to keep next to the sink and it has smashed my lid and the base - it was not even my biggest stone!

as I use my slow cooker to cook my Christmas pud I have got to get one pronto as I am a week behind

Could I use my stones kettle?:confused:

Reply
Nicola C
Posts: 60
(@nicola-c)
Trusted Member
Joined: 14 years ago

i had a treatment from someone who kept their stones in a slow cooker and forund it extreamly anoying as all i could hear throught the treatment was a spoon ratteling around the cooker. there isnt im my opinion a cooker better suited to stones than those designed for them, paul telling do really good ones the heaters may be expensive but if cared for properly should last a life time. and having them thermostatically controlled is a must as much for you as your client.
nic

Reply
kpuk
Posts: 919
 kpuk
(@kpuk)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago

I bought mine as a complete kit from Ellisons a few years back, so it is a "special" Thermal Stone heater and has this printed on it - does help to look a bit more professional I think! It has a preheat, then a sliding temperature control (the kit comes with a meat type thermometer which I leave in the water at all times) I was taught to keep the stones between 120 and 140 degrees, and find it easy to adjust the temperature as I do the massage.

I started out with the basic number of stones (Can't remember exact amount) and have added to that over the years, I love the really big placement stones that don't come with the original kit - I can now just about fit all the stones in the heater to get them heated, once I am massaging there is plenty of room, as I do tend to take a few at a time out and keep them near me in a padded towelling bag which keeps them warm and stops the clunking about that someone mentioned!

BTW I do tell my clients that this massage can be a bit clunky as I need to get the stones out of the heater - better to let them know before hand! Most say they are so relaxed they didn't notice at the end. I have tried putting a flannel in the bottom of the heater, but it just got on my nerves!!

Karen

Reply
northwestchick
Posts: 9
(@northwestchick)
Active Member
Joined: 13 years ago

With regards to the slow cookers used, you will have to remember IF ever you had a claim against you regarding methods used in your Hot Stone Therapy, your insurance will not insure you for not using correct equipment. In most stone therapy courses they seem to drill this into you.;)
That goes for having them PAT tested each year too and any extension leads or electrical products used. Lots of small print in them dreaded insurance policies.
I would go for the Stone heaters every time, just for that peace of mind.

Reply
MAYHEW820
Posts: 19
(@mayhew820)
Active Member
Joined: 13 years ago

Hello,

I got my heater from 'best massage couches' online. I got the big one (18 quart)as they suggest you need this for the full set of stones (57). Its massive!! At least 20" long, maybe a bit more. If you want all your stones placed in there at once not being on top of each other then its great. I use a net washing bag for all my spinal layout stones, toe stones ect so i just grab the bag and pull them all out in one go. Saves time and noise fishing them out individually. Doesnt matter if they are on top of each other, Takes up much less space.
I wish i had got the smaller one (6 quart), i am sure it would have been more practical and to be honest, its rare if i ever you all the stones in one go.

Sally x

Reply
bodyworkzone
Posts: 7
(@bodyworkzone)
Active Member
Joined: 12 years ago

cheaper digitally controlled heaters now available

paul telling do really good ones the heaters may be expensive but if cared for properly should last a life time. and having them thermostatically controlled is a must as much for you as your client.
nic

We now offer much cheaper digital thermostat heaters on eBay (search for "digital hot stone heater"). They offer precision temperature control. There are two digital displays, one of which shows the desired temperature that you have set, and the other offers a continually updated display of the actual water temperature. Unfortunately there is only one source for these heaters globally, as a large distributor has an exclusive contract with the manufacturer. The distributor roughly doubles the price that the manufacturer charges them, making them more expensive than if we were able to buy from the manufacturer directly, but they are still less than half the price of other digitally controlled heaters.

Reply
thesecretyou
Posts: 41
(@thesecretyou)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago

what to buy for hot stone massage

Hi.. sorry havant read all the threads first so this might have been said..
I do Hot Stone and purchased a 6.5 heater and 45 stones that's all you need do not go for 18 size heater it is massive.. the extra stones you can pick up at the mind body shows as you work out what stones you work with and like, the really tiny stones you wont use anyway except for the toes, then you just need 8, also cold stones in mable... why.. just use your black stones in cold water... you find less stones works better.

Hope that helps.

G x

Reply
myarka
Posts: 5221
(@myarka)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 13 years ago

.......the really tiny stones you wont use anyway except for the toes, then you just need 8, also cold stones in mable... why.. just use your black stones in cold water... you find less stones works better.

I don't actually agree.....

I've found that I've added to my stones over the years, each natural stone being unique and having it's specific purpose. As for the tiny stones, I've extras that I use for face massage, so 8 for the toes and use another for the face. The smaller the stone, the shorter they hold the heat.

I freeze my cold marble stones, and again they will sooner warm to room temp, so it's good to have a selection.

My clients love a face massage with alternating hot ant cold stones, it's one of the best stress busters going.

Myarka.

Reply
cola
Posts: 466
 cola
(@cola)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago

How many stones you want all depends on what you are doing with them. I used to just use the basic 8 toe stones, I quickly upped that to 16 because I am ultra cautious with anything to do with feet and leave toe stones in kill-every-possible-organism solution for at least 30min, so I wouldn't have enough time to do that between every client, unless I was taking the toe stones out, saying 'I'm just going to clean and sanitise these stones, back in a few minutes' and go clean stones rather than treat client.
Then with longer treatments, I will replace hot toe stones with fresh ones, so, that doubled up the number of stones, so I've got 32 hot toe stones available at the start of the day, and 8 cold toe stones. Then one advanced course I did had an amazing face routine using stones that are a tiny bit bigger than toe stones, if do that routine, I'll use another 20-40 about just a bit bigger than toe stone sized stones, and I'll often use from 50-80 normal sized stones in an average treatment. 50-80 normal stones won't fit in 6.5l heater, I get about 10-14 normal sized stones and one large stone in a 6.5l heater. If someone is getting 45 stones in a 6.5l heater, they are pretty small stones compared to what I would call 'normal sized' stones.

If you train with little stones you are probably going to want to continue use very small to small stones, if you train with big stones, you probably will want to use very small to very big stones. A set of smaller stones will be a lot cheaper for the stones and any shipping compared to a set with larger stones that will be heavier and usually hold the heat better due to the greater thermal mass. I've purchased 66piece stone sets that weighed 6.5kg, I've purchased 50piece stone sets that weighed 15kg - average weight of stones 100g vs 300g - which holds the heat better if they are similar material? Which cost more than double in shipping? which cost more than double for the stones themselves? which fit in a 6.5l heater? which set would be the best for mobile?

Anyone that says you only need 20 stones and a small heater is severly limiting what you can do with the stones, anyone that says you must have 66 stones and a 18l heater, is often selling expensive stone sets. There are no absolutes about the 'correct' number of stones and exactly what you have to do in a stone routine, other than you better know what is a 'safe' temperature to use on a client - and 'safe' doesn't just mean does not burn them.

Reply
AMG
Posts: 2
 AMG
(@amg)
New Member
Joined: 9 years ago

Which Hot Stones Heater???!!!

Hi All.

I'm wondering which hot stones heater to purchase. I work from home and intend buying a 45 basalt stones set. However I am usure of the size of heater I will require. There's a 6 quart (wondering if I'd get 45 stones in this) or an 18 quart (wondering if this would be too large). I have a catlogue in front of me but very hard to judge the sizes. Any help appreciated 🙂

Ms Veggie

Hiya, just wondering if you decided on a heater or slow cooker? I am doing a Stone Therapy course in a couple of weeks and have started looking at heaters and stones but not sure what to choose. Any advice?? After the course I can buy the heater with 48 stones from the college for £250. Definately need to find something cheaper than that. Any advice appreciated. (I work from home and mobile):confused:

Reply
luizotavio39
Posts: 16
(@luizotavio39)
Active Member
Joined: 10 years ago

Correct Temperature and make it easy to do in house calls

I do Hot Stones in almost 100% of my sessions, even in house calls.

I just have a ordinary crock pot, with only 9 stones... 6 to really do the work, and 3 static just for the cervical and rhomboid area when the client is in supine position. As a thermometer I use my anticubital area, I never burn a client using this method .

Reply
myarka
Posts: 5221
(@myarka)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 13 years ago

I do Hot Stones in almost 100% of my sessions, even in house calls.

I just have a ordinary crock pot, with only 9 stones... 6 to really do the work, and 3 static just for the cervical and rhomboid area when the client is in supine position. As a thermometer I use my anticubital area, I never burn a client using this method .

What do you use for spinal, chakra, grandmother, hand stones, etc?

Myarka.

Reply
luizotavio39
Posts: 16
(@luizotavio39)
Active Member
Joined: 10 years ago

Myarka

I think your are mentioning the La Stone Therapy right ? there are other styles of Hot Stone Massage...

I was initiated by Mother Makawee in North Dakota in 2003... completely different style, very powerful and very pratical... unfortunately I can not post a video here, a link to youtube...

Reply
Desi Girl
Posts: 53
(@desi-girl)
Trusted Member
Joined: 10 years ago

Hi Ms Veggie,

I bought this Hot Stone heater

[url]Holistic Supplies 60 Piece Massage Stone Kit + 6 Quart Heater: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics[/url]

And this Accessory Kit

[url]Holistic Supplies Accessory Kit: Amazon.co.uk: Health & Beauty[/url]

I originally bought an 18 quart from Ebay but returned it as I felt it was too big at a loss of £25.00:(

Hope this is of help.

Desi Girl
x
🙂

Reply
The Eye
Posts: 4
(@the-eye)
New Member
Joined: 10 years ago

Heaters/ correct use of temperature

Hi

I've read all the threads here and just have a few little things to suggest. Firstly, using the "hot" stones in a massage treatment is to get heat to the muscle quicker so that manipulation can take place and increase circulation. Bringing the "correct temperature" to the body is key. Too hot will burn, too cool will not do the job properly - either way creating unnecessary problems for you the therapist. You don't cook fishfingers under the grill at a higher heat to cook quicker - they burn - you reduce temperature over a longer period of time, then you heat them perfectly. (sorry slightly lame analogy I know but you get the message!).

I've been delivering and teaching hot and cold stones for 15 years now and I've used all sorts of heating 'contraptions' on my journeys teaching. The safest smartest heating unit to use is one with a digital thermometer - end of story. They offer precise temperature at ALL times, not once in my stone career have I ever heard of anyone getting burnt using these digital units, and they last forever (well occasionally, once in seven years or so occassionally) they may need a new digital temperature gage or element but easy and cost effective to replace rather than having to buy a brand new unit. I'm still using the one I was using 8 years ago, perfectly in tune.

As a professional therapist you have a duty to be responsible enough to use safe equipment and techniques in the treatment room. Why bother cutting corners at the expense of your reputation and your clients time and money. Throughout my therapy career I have heard endless stories of therapists burning themselves using manual water heaters and clients visiting stone therapists and being badly burnt. There was a programme recently on BBC3 highlighting these very issues and one gentleman showing us the burns he sustained from too hot stones being used on his back, in a well known spa in Essex. Burns which were still visible months later!

Therapists who don't take reasonable due care and attention in their work are creating a bad reputation in the industry and us professionals are suffering because of it. Someone mentioned training earlier too - that's a whole other thread which maybe I will get my teeth stuck into soon.

Anyone looking to buy a safe, easy to use, solid, longlife heater needs to invest in a Digital Thermostatic Stone Heater, try looking at Stoneforest or Paul Tellings Units, they are by far the best on the market and units the BBC3 programme suggest buying too! 😉

Reply
Page 1 / 2
Share: