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Bull..... about colonics


Patchouli
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I have never read as much claptrap about colonics from uninformed people on this site recently.

In the hands of a highly trained accredited practitioner colonics are very safe. They were done this way in nursing prior to phosphate enemas being developed (with no problems, I may add).

If you go for a colonic ask to see the pracitioners certificates, insurance and membership of governing body.

It is not a cheap treatment for a reason. If someone is charging less than £50-£80 for a treatment then there is a reason for it.

If your therapist does not instil you with confidence nor put you at ease then leave.

I am seriously thinking of asking the site mods/owners if I can put a sticky re best practice in colonics so that the general public know what to look for in a practitioner (and to dispel some of the urban myths that some would wish to abound:rolleyes:)

Anways.....have to get to work...have 6 colonics in today, four returners (must have done something right the first time;)) and two newbies who are coming on the advice of friends who have also been to me.

Patchouli (aka Hercules...if yah know yah Greek!!)

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Patchouli
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Advice for people thinking of having a colonic.

When looking for a colonic hydrotherapist/irrigationist some of the following may be useful to know. Until colonics become regulated it is not an offence for anyone to set themselves up as a therapist (pretty much the same as most complementary therapies). It is your body you are putting in someone’s hands and like all CT’s it is best to ensure......

1. Do they belong to any governing body (if not, why not. Don’t be afraid to ask). If they belong to a governing body then they will have fulfilled certain criteria in regards to training (minimum 10 days and medical/nursing background to begin with). They should also do annual cpd (continuing professional development)

2. If they do not have membership of a governing body then ask where did they train, how long was the training? Was the training insurable, can you see their insurance certificate?

3. How long do they allow for a treatment? First time the actual appointment should take one and a half hours to allow for a proper consultation, examinations and explanations and aftercare advice. Actual treatment time is approx 45 minutes. Subsequent appointment times should take an hour.

4. Do they take blood pressure (very high/untreated high blood pressure contra-indicated) and carry out a rectal examination prior to treatment. No practitioner should ever insert a speculum into someone’s back passage without doing a rectal examination first. If your therapist does not do this then ask why (better still..leave). The rectal exam should only be required on first visit and is to ascertain any contra-indications to treatment such as internal haemorrhoids, fissures and fistulas.

5. Does the practitioner instil you with confidence...if not, why not?

6. Does the practitioner offer a full explanation of the treatment and also keep you informed during the treatment of what is happening and why it is happening?

7. Is the premises/room immaculate, are there signs of sterilising facilities such as antibacterial cleaners, autoclaves, cold water sterilising equipment. Is the toilet clean (check before treatment starts? If toilet is dirty then it goes without saying that practitioners practice may be also poor). When was the last time the clinic was inspected by the governing body?

8. Does the practitioner use disposable equipment (preferable) or stainless steel speculums? If reusable stainless steel has it been sterilised prior to use on you?

9. After treatment does the practitioner offer follow-up advice and a means to contact them (if required) following treatment?

This list is not exhaustive and is by no means an answer all. However, it is intended to empower would be clients of colonic hydrotherapy/irrigation by having some knowledge of what should be expected of their practitioner.

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Davidmh
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When looking for a colonic hydrotherapist/irrigationist some of the following may be useful to know. Until colonics become regulated it is not an offence for anyone to set themselves up as a therapist (pretty much the same as most complementary therapies). It is your body you are putting in someone’s hands and like all CT’s it is best to ensure......

1. Do they belong to any governing body (if not, why not. Don’t be afraid to ask). If they belong to a governing body then they will have fulfilled certain criteria in regards to training (minimum 10 days and medical/nursing background to begin with). They should also do annual cpd (continuing professional development)

2. If they do not have membership of a governing body then ask where did they train, how long was the training? Was the training insurable, can you see their insurance certificate?

3. How long do they allow for a treatment? First time the actual appointment should take one and a half hours to allow for a proper consultation, examinations and explanations and aftercare advice. Actual treatment time is approx 45 minutes. Subsequent appointment times should take an hour.

4. Do they take blood pressure (very high/untreated high blood pressure contra-indicated) and carry out a rectal examination prior to treatment. No practitioner should ever insert a speculum into someone’s back passage without doing a rectal examination first. If your therapist does not do this then ask why (better still..leave). The rectal exam should only be required on first visit and is to ascertain any contra-indications to treatment such as internal haemorrhoids, fissures and fistulas.

5. Does the practitioner instil you with confidence...if not, why not?

6. Does the practitioner offer a full explanation of the treatment and also keep you informed during the treatment of what is happening and why it is happening?

7. Is the premises/room immaculate, are there signs of sterilising facilities such as antibacterial cleaners, autoclaves, cold water sterilising equipment. Is the toilet clean (check before treatment starts? If toilet is dirty then it goes without saying that practitioners practice may be also poor). When was the last time the clinic was inspected by the governing body?

8. Does the practitioner use disposable equipment (preferable) or stainless steel speculums? If reusable stainless steel has it been sterilised prior to use on you?

9. After treatment does the practitioner offer follow-up advice and a means to contact them (if required) following treatment?

This list is not exhaustive and is by no means an answer all. However, it is intended to empower would be clients of colonic hydrotherapy/irrigation by having some knowledge of what should be expected of their practitioner.

Good thread.
I applaud your obvious professionalism.

David:)

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Patchouli
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Thanks David

Some of the comments I have read elsewhere would begger belief.

I am not saying damage can never be done but in the hands of a good practitioner then colonics should be a safe and gentle procedure.

Twice this week I have heard clients say they actually found it relaxing and last week one guy described it as cathartic ;). Most clients say that it was a much more pleasant procedure than they anticipated.

Speculum insertion should never be uncomfortable if it is then it will most likely be due to the client contracting the muscles in the rectum as they know somethings going in. A skilled therapist will have already put the client at ease and if it does still happen will have the patience to wait till the client relaxes (I tend to ask about kids, hobbies, work or tell some funny stories). First time clients are invariably extremely nervous and putting them at ease is paramount.

If someone gets a bit crampy then the therapist should be able to control the water temperature or use herbal implants to alleviate this.

As previously said, overfill of water is not possible as it would merely expel via the rectum (water being what it is will always find the route of least resistance). I also instruct the client to advise me of when they want the "hold" released therefore putting them in control of the treatment.

Clients also have to take the responsibility in the fact that they have presented themselves for a treatment and will have signed a consent to treatment form. They way I have read some of the posts from people who have had treatments on this forum would almost make you think that they were taken under duress :eek:.

It is also clients responsibility to ensure that they put their body in the hands of a skilled practitioner (would you go for open heart surgery to someone who had only ever worked as the hospital porter). Ignorance and failure to ascertain someones credentials is imo totally foolhardy, yet many do this and then complain when things didn't go quite according to what they thought.

There is some methods of colonics that the governing body I belong to will not sanction and will not let practitioners of these join due to the fact these methods are not considered good practice. I do not want to mention them by name but would urge would-be clients to do their own research.

Possibly it is these places that people who have encountered problems have attended?????:(

Patchouli

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poppyfields
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I've only had one experience of colonics, and I'm afraid I wasn't won over by my experience, although the practioner (imo) was lovely, very professional, talked me through everything, made me feel at ease, explained what was happening.

I was considering training in it at the end of this year, but on reflection realised that it wasn't for me.

I also have had colon massages and I had the same experience, so perhaps my colon is particularly sensitive.

The contra-actions of my colonic was:

* severe cramping
* feeling of constipation

this lasted for about a week.

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Patchouli
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Were you very constipated prior to your treatment Poppyfields as that or a high intake of fizzy drinks or gas producing foods (causing lots of gas) would be the cause of your cramping.

Again a good therapist would have explained why you were crampy...not unusual in people with constipation (even mild) or who are generally gassy.

You said tho a feeling of constipation afterwards but what you said about your experience would lead me to believe you already may have been somewhat constipated and when you get crampy it is because peristalsis causing the muscles to contract against hard impacted stools either that or, as already said, you were retaining a lot of wind/gas. It is not usual for people who aren't constipated or gassy to experience cramping.

By constipated I mean if you do not go every day for a bowel movement.

It never fails to surprise me the people who come for colonics who only poo 2-3 times a week and think that is normal. It amazes me even more when they tell me "the doctor said that was just normal for me". It isn't....at least once a day, preferably twice or three times for bowel movements is normal (as long as it is not loose).

Think about all the food you put in your body. If you ain't going at least once a day then it has to be stored somewhere!!!!!

The fact you are having the same experience with abdominal massage would lead me to believe that you probably have more going on with your gut than you are aware of. But, then again maybe you are aware that there is more going on hence your visit to a colonic hydrotherapist.:)

It is also possible to use herbal implants or control the water temperature to relieve cramping, did your therapist use herbs during your treatment as something such as wild yam is good for gas and chamomile for reducing an irritable/inflamed colon? All therapist are taught how to use herbs during their training but many don't due to the added cost and that they are fiddly to use by having to add on more equipment. I use herbs as standard practice (if required).

I would suggest some dietary advice, removal of foods that may be exacerbating your condition and there are a number of supplements that would help a sensitive gut such as :

Aloe vera, slippery elm, marshmallow, Licorice (as long as you don't have high blood pressure and never for more than 4-5 weeks with licorice).

Digestive enzymes (if there was a lot of undigested food in your stools expelled, did your therapist tell you this? as this would also cause you to be gassy). Did you therapist tell you or even better show you what was coming out? I do, if the client wants to see. I am always wary of therapists who don't give the opportunity for a client to see the result. Did you actually have a result more to the point?

L-glutamine (an amino acid that helps with the healing process)

and a good quality probiotic (by good quality I mean one which has at least 4-12 different strains of gut flora, is a capsule or powder, not tablet and needs kept in the fridge).

Did your therapist give you any of this information?

That is what I mean about a highly skilled (and knowlegable) therapist. They should have been able to explain and give you all this advice.

Otherwise it is just a mechanical, perfunctory procedure and hasn't been done holistically. No matter how nice the therapist is if they cannot give follow up advice then all they are doing is a procedure.:(

Long winded reply but I would like to hope you already got all that from your therapist, if not......:(

Patchouli

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Patchouli
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p.s. Poppyfields, what was your consultation like?

I have been to places where all I was given was a list of contraindications with tick boxes (took 2 minutes to complete). Then was given the treatment. No asking of bowel habits, medication, diet or anything. I am fortunate I do not suffer much bowel stuff (take an excellent probiotic).

My consultation take as about half an hour and is four pages long and includes such things as the Bristol Stool Scale, medication they are taking (plays a big part on gut health) and asks a plethora of dietary questions.

Which was yours like?

Patchouli

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Tarotlady
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I have never read as much claptrap about colonics from uninformed people on this site recently.

In the hands of a highly trained accredited practitioner colonics are very safe. They were done this way in nursing prior to phosphate enemas being developed (with no problems, I may add).

Oh yes ... I remember my nurse training in the mid eighties and "bowel washouts" were an everyday occurrence on the surgical ward. I recall the "warm soapy water" tube, funnel and bucket at the side of the bed.

We were shown how to do it, supervised a couple of time and then you were on your own 😮

Looking back I think OMG but nobody seemed to come to any harm 🙂

Not something I'd recommend anyone tries at home mind 😉

Barbara x

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poppyfields
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Thanks patchouli, very comprehensive answer.

the consultation took about 20 minutes, I was already taking acidipholous,digestive enzymes and omega 3,6, 9 prior to my appointment.

I was told that I had candida just by the consultation and we talked about food elimination.

He told me he would go gently with me, but after the treatment told me that he had infact done the opposite as I was so full of gas that he was trying to get things moving.

I have since cut out wheat and dairy for 6 weeks.

I am consipated, I go 2-3 times a week and am a very "windy" person. I have had food intolerance tests in the past and try to stick to it as much as I can even after the 6 weeks.

I did ring him a week later to get reassurance, I was panicking by then as thought he had damaged my colon and it would be long term. so much so that I went to the GP and he prescribed me IBS meds, which I took for a week until my gut felt it had normalised.

no, he didn't use any herbs. his system appeared to be old, he used a shower unit to fill a plastic container up above my head and he kept on filling me up with water until I said I was at a "7" for discomfort before he let it drain.

no, I didn't see what was going on.

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steverobbo
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just a quick one as i'm rushing out.

I had a colonic a while back and found it pretty uncomfortable - The woman who did it was chatting away to me and I was getting more and more 'full' and it started to hurt so I mentioned it and she immediately apologised and released the water, saying she had lost track of what she was doing as she was talking.:eek:

I didn't go back but since then I have developed an extremely painful fistula (goggle it) and as you mention above Patchouli that water will find the weakest point to get out, I wonder whether this is a possible reason for the development of said fistula.

I have a hospital appointment next week as they advised the only way to effectively deal with it is an operation, and I wonder whether this could have caused / contributed to it?

Have you ever heard of this happening?

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Davidmh
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I had a colonic a while back and found it pretty uncomfortable - The woman who did it was chatting away to me and I was getting more and more 'full' and it started to hurt so I mentioned it and she immediately apologised and released the water, saying she had lost track of what she was doing as she was talking.:eek:

I didn't go back but since then I have developed an extremely painful fistula (goggle it) and as you mention above Patchouli that water will find the weakest point to get out, I wonder whether this is a possible reason for the development of said fistula.

I have a hospital appointment next week as they advised the only way to effectively deal with it is an operation, and I wonder whether this could have caused / contributed to it?

Have you ever heard of this happening?

Hi,

I know very little about colonics, but I googled fistulas. Your question suggests a suprising lack of knowledge about the workings of the human body. Put simply, there is no way a fistula could be caused by a colonic.
This is because it is far easier for the body to expel water from an already established channel (the rectal passage) than going to the trouble of creating an instant new channel for itself.

Morphing, unless you are extremely and unusually gifted (in which case you could presumably also instantly close said fistual without the need for surgery) simply does not happen in the real world.

David:)

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steverobbo
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David,

If you read my post I simply asked if it was possible that this was the cause - I see no need for you to be quite so blunt and obnoxious in your reply.

Did you not get what you wanted for Christmas?

Perhaps if people like you didn't post your smart-arse replies, and just gave honest answers to questions that people ask, then maybe more people would feel welcome, instead of the constant arguing that appears here all too often now - You can put this one down to you:mad:

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Moonfairy
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By constipated I mean if you do not go every day for a bowel movement.

It never fails to surprise me the people who come for colonics who only poo 2-3 times a week and think that is normal. It amazes me even more when they tell me "the doctor said that was just normal for me". It isn't....at least once a day, preferably twice or three times for bowel movements is normal (as long as it is not loose).

I always thought that it was not essential to have one bowel motion a day. - that it may be normal for some people, but for others going every second day or several times a day is normal. I generally don't go once a day, generally every other :029:, and it never even crossed my mind that this was anything other than normal but that it was just the way my body worked.:confused:

As for colonics, I am sure you are providing a very professional and valuable service Patchouli but the idea of having a colonic for me personally is :speechless-smiley-0
Thanks for that dietary advice though. I'll take that onboard.:hug: I love licorice and am tempted to buy some whenever I go into H&B.;)

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Patchouli
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Really surprised MF that you think that less than everyday is normal, it isn't. At least once a day and preferably 2/3 times a day.:D When you think all the food remnants end up in the large intestine and the longer it just lies there fermenting away....

It worries me when docs say to their patients "only go twice a week, thats just normal for you" :eek:.

I did my dissertation for my nutrition course on bowel disease (and the use of probiotics) and most of the research I used was from the doctors bible bmj publication "Gut" which agreed that 1-3 formed bowel movements a day was best and yet GP's still spout the nonsense that they do.:confused:. In general imo most docs just aren't interested in bowel conditions and tend to pap patients off with a variety of aperients and their knowledge of nutrition amounts to diddly squat unfortunately.

Thats the reason the western world has so much bowel disease:(.

That and the food industry!!

Patchouli

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Patchouli
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Hi Steve, imo the only way that a colonic would cause a fistula would be if the bowel lining was punctured during insertion of the speculum and believe me I think you would have known that at the time as it would have been extremely painful. Speculum insertion should never be uncomfortable, only you would know if yours was and I don't imagine a therapist would force a speculum in if someone was tight down there (which is why a rectal examination is paramount prior to treatment).

If you were getting full of water during your treatment it would start leaking from your rectum before causing any damage. As I have said, water will look for the easiest exit. Were you not instructed by your therapist to let her know when you felt you wanted the water released? I always tell my clients to only hold as long as they are comfortable and let me know when they want the "release", that way they are in control of the treatment.

Fistulas are extremely common, especially in young children (who haven't had colonics) and women who have given birth but have a narrow birth canal or have been too young (check The Fistula Foundation which sends the Mercy Ships to operate on fistulas for young girls damaged giving birth at the ages of 11ish due to rape and forced marriages).

Fistulas can occur anywhere (even in the oesophogus) given that fistula just means an abnormal passageway in the body.

Without knowing more about your previous medical history, where the fistula is and even as much as your sexual preferences :o. I could only hazard a guess at why you have gone on to develop this.

I hope it isn't affecting you too much and you get it repaired soon.

Patchouli

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Moonfairy
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Really surprised MF that you think that less than everyday is normal, it isn't. At least once a day and preferably 2/3 times a day.:D When you think all the food remnants end up in the large intestine and the longer it just lies there fermenting away....

It worries me when docs say to their patients "only go twice a week, thats just normal for you" :eek:.

Hi Patchouli

Your statement worried me too, but I won't go runniing for the laxatives just yet. Lol. If I went 2/3 times a day I'd think I had a bad bout of diarrhoea.:(

The links I have read on the net have only confimed my understanding that normal is not necessarily once a day. Such as:

You might wonder how often you should have a bowel movement. There is no right or wrong answer to this as there is a very wide range of ‘normal’ bowel habits.
It is not essential for you to have one bowel motion a day. It may be normal for some people, but for others going every second day or several times a day is normal.
It is not essential for you to have one bowel motion a day. It may be normal for some people, but for others going every second day or several times a day is normal.
You can usually think of your bowel habits as ‘normal’ if you

  • Have regular bowel movements (not necessarily once a day)
  • Don’t have symptoms of
  • Can go without straining or using

Anyway, no offence intended but I'd only seek a colonic as a very last resort.;)

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Patchouli
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Hi MF, I could find as much info to say that once a day IS normal and like all research there will always be incongruity. 😉

I suggest Elizabeth Lipski, "Digestive Wellness" a classic in gut health but could cite many more if so inclined. The BMJ is full of research into the high incidence of bowel disease causes...diet and poor bowel habits being the most prevalant reasons.

Hell...even the way our toilet pans are designed is not conducive to good bowel habits.

Have you ever been in a country where it is squat holes in the floor for a toilet? Some people think that is uncivilised yet that is the way it should be....not sitting on something like a chair/throne. The Western world has got it all wrong re bowel health.

I would never suggest anyone took laxatives, I am vehemently against them.....thats what medics prescribe :(. They make the bowel lazy. Having seen clients come in and taking five different types is scary enough.

Colonics are for some and not for others...so be it, live and let live I say.

Who was it that said...."let food be thy medicine and let medicine be thy food"

Anything that can be sorted by diet alone, should be imo. I often tell my colonic clients that too.:)

Patchouli

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Bannick
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I always thought that it was not essential to have one bowel motion a day. - that it may be normal for some people, but for others going every second day or several times a day is normal. I generally don't go once a day, generally every other :029:, and it never even crossed my mind that this was anything other than normal but that it was just the way my body worked.:confused:

As for colonics, I am sure you are providing a very professional and valuable service Patchouli but the idea of having a colonic for me personally is :speechless-smiley-0
Thanks for that dietary advice though. I'll take that onboard.:hug: I love licorice and am tempted to buy some whenever I go into H&B.;)

I know what you mean about colonics being "not for me personally". My wife has had colonics, countless clients of mine have also had it but I've never fancied it myself, despite knowing the benefits. That said, I think it's partly because a good friend of mine did my wife's colonics and it would be weird having a friend do it.

However, once every couple of days?? As well as looking at my diet, possibly seeing a dietician or nutritional therapit, I'd be more tepmted by the colonics! I'm one of those lucky people where it's 2-3 times per day and can practically set my watch based on what time I last ate!

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Patchouli
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However, once every couple of days?? As well as looking at my diet, possibly seeing a dietician or nutritional therapit, I'd be more tepmted by the colonics! I'm one of those lucky people where it's 2-3 times per day and can practically set my watch based on what time I last ate!

:D:D:D We should have a survey (anonymous of course) as to how often HP members "go" on a daily basis.

The longest I have known anyone is 10 days (seen that two or three times now :eek:) must be in awful pain.

Patchouli

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calla lily
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Seeing as you've mentioned it Patchouli :D, I usually go on a daily basis in the morning, but the prelude to actually going has me doubled up in pain as the spasms are pretty strong ( I have IBS).

Last week was the first time ever that the pain from being constipated had me concerned and disrupted my sleep. It was self inflicted though, as I skipped my breakfast ( either porridge or fruit n fibre) and I festively swapped my usual intake of water for the old Vino.:o

Regarding a Colonic, I'm half and half. It does interest me, as I feel I would benefit from it. What stops me is being very self conscious/squeamish that end of me, as with the fear of not being able to last a session.

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meurighj
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Thank you Patchouli for sage, well-informed advice it is much appreciated.

I have to say I am surprised when people say they don't go often. I'm regular, once often twice a day. I take the view that if my little dog can produce the amount he does, as often as he does, on a daily basis on 2 bowls of dog food (and we give him the recommended amount, no scraps or 'human' food), then with the amount of food I ingest I should be following his example (except I do use the bathroom not the nearest patch of grass!!:D)

Blessings

Helen

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