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different methods to help quit smoking

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 Raya
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(@raya)
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Joined: 17 years ago

I am thinking of giving up smoking again, I did it once before 2 years ago for 3 months. Became utterly depressed (apparently a normal reaction to nicotine withdrawal) so started smoking again (about 20 roll ups a day).

I really have to give it my best shot this time as I am worried about my health. But I'd like to know more about different methods to help you along the way. I will be going to a smoke cessation clinic as before and either nicotine replacement (patches) or possibly champix (yet to find out about this although recommended by doctor).

But I have been thinking that I need to deal with the psychological aspect to my addiction. Because I love smoking, it's my friend, crutch, helper, treat and always there for me. I know all this is totally wrong but I'm being honest and I know I need to deal with this part as well as the physical addiction!

I'd like to hear from anyone who can suggest or have tried hypnotherapy. I don;t know much about EFT of other similar therapies but I'd love to hear about anything like this that may help.

How do you get to the point where you hate cigarettes and how do you change your perception of them?

I look forward to hearing from anyone with any ideas on this subject.

Best wishes,

Raya x

PS Over this last week I have halved my intake from 20 to 10 to try and prepare myself a bit. It hasnt been too bad either!

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Posts: 3
(@sophiana)
New Member
Joined: 12 years ago

I am really happy to see people giving out so many ways to quit smoking.I just want to add Sonething here. Concentrate on those things in life which are really important. Don't waste your money on mere smoking. Instead go for a an excellent life with no hassles.

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Posts: 2
(@kndge9584)
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Joined: 12 years ago

I am thinking of giving up smoking again, I did it once before 2 years ago for 3 months. Became utterly depressed (apparently a normal reaction to nicotine withdrawal) so started smoking again (about 20 roll ups a day)

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Posts: 74
(@a_son_unique)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago

Hi

I know its been a few months since you posted this so you may have well stopped by now or you may still be trying to give up, either way I wanted to share my thoughts with you and anyone else who is thinking about giving up smoking.

I quit smoking nearly 6 months ago now but it wasn't without a 2 year struggle until I finally cracked it and found the key to success which I understand now comes with trying and learning and when it may seem like you are not getting anywhere in fact what is difficult to realise is that in some cases you are preparing the ground work for what will come to be later provided you dont give up on giving up.

The short of it is get your mind focused, make yourself hate smoking and get pissed off everytime you put one in your mouth or when your sat there feeling like poop because you haven't got the energy to get up and do something and that in itself will help you in the long term to get to your destination.

When the nurse at my doctor surgery told me dont worry if you fail this time just keep trying and you will get there, she said it was a learning curve and at the time I didn't really take notice of what she was saying but its true, the more you try the more you learn and the easier it gets plus if you give up a few times in the period of a couple years then I think that the first time you give up will be the hardest but if you last a good 6 weeks but fail and smoke again for a a couple of months before re-attempting it again I think personally that you break the back of the addiction because each time I tried after that it never seemed as difficult as the first.

It's when you've failed a couple of times and yet smoking is still winding you up and getting you down that at some stage you'll reach a point where you'll just know that you cannot smoke anymore, the most difficult think about giving up for me was that when I stopped I had the motivation in mind which was the pains associated with smoking and the lack of energy which drove my motivation, oddly enough though when you stop the pains disappear, your energy levels rise and I found the reason for giving up had vanished and so did the will power and by the time I knew it I was smoking again. Looking back now it was all part of the learning process, I guess everyone has there own way but this is my story which may or may not help you.

It took me time before I got there but eventually I did, like I said if you keep trying you'll get to a point where you just know that its not getting any easier to smoke and more importantly you'll reach an understanding in your mind which to me is the key. The benefits far out weight negatives.

One last very important which I nearly forgot is how its never easy to reach the point where you will happily wake up and say today is the day where I will stop...it doesn;t work like that, it will never be easy to stop but what you must understand is that its the addiction talking, it has moulded itself around your very being to make you think its part of you and it does a great job, what you must do is make yourself see the addiction from an objective point of view, see it as trickery, the nicotine becomes you and doesn't want you to see it for what it really is, it makes itself your best friend, your crutch, there in good times and bad, its like a sister or brother, even best friend, all you need to do is step back from it and see it for what it trully is and understand that you wont feel this way forever, your brain will adjust and will get used to not smoking and you will reach a point where you can finally sit there free of addiction and think what did I ever see in it. I promise it does get easier over time just keep soldiering on.

Best of luck to anyone who is thinking of giving up or is in the process of giving up.

It's the best feeling in the world to know you've conquered it and that you are free once and for all.

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CarolineN
Posts: 4760
(@carolinen)
Famed Member
Joined: 15 years ago

Well done A_son_unique - what an effort and what excellent success! Thank you for sharing.

Another thing about smoking is the smell - on your breath :eek:, on your clothes - yuk! - and the room where you smoke - ugh! It permeates everything and makes me feel sick. I am so grateful with the smoking ban that I can now go out to pubs and restaurents occasionally and know I shall not be put off by someone smoking.

For some of us smoking is a complete turn-off!

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Posts: 6
(@hstreak)
Active Member
Joined: 12 years ago

I think if really want to leave smoking, then you need to start some walk, running and exercise, for which you need to have some stamina. And you will surly struggle for it because of smoking. And in order to increase your stamina you will ultimately leave smoking.

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Posts: 6
(@hstreak)
Active Member
Joined: 12 years ago

I think if really want to leave smoking, then you need to start some walk, running and exercise, for which you need to have some stamina. And you will surly struggle for it because of smoking. And in order to increase your stamina you will ultimately leave smoking.

Thats what i think about that, what's you think giveu your ideas and opinions?

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(@sacred-soul)
Active Member
Joined: 11 years ago

I used to smoke about 10 per day for around 6 years and tried to quit a few times and every time I tried and failed I realised I was still sort of using cigarettes.

What I mean by that is I was still having odd puffs of someone elses or having an odd couple cigarettes when out drinking etc and the cravings never went away and gradually the smoking crept back in again. This happened quite a few times.

I've not touched a cigarette for 4 years now and the way I finally quit was at the same time as my other half - something which I believed helped us both to quit as we didn't want to let each other down and supported each other, although I'm sure in some circumstances this could work against you too and you could lure each other back to smoking.

I went completely cold turkey but tried to keep the same routine as best I could. I basically still went outside with all the smokers and also if I was at home when I would usually have a cigarette but instead of a cigarette I would stand with the smokers outside and have a coffee then after the coffee when we went inside I would chew normal chewing gum.

The cravings were there quite strongly for the first few weeks but then got less and less and it got easier and easier. I also started at the gym the same time I stopped - figured the two kind of go hand in hand - and at first I couldn't breathe but then as the weeks went by I could breathe easier and easier and got fitter and fitter. This proved to be great motivation to stick to things so this and the routine that I tried to keep with the coffee breaks etc and the fact that I literally didn't even have a drag of a cigarette to completely rid my body of the chemicals, I think are the key factors.

This way probably isn't for everyone but it worked for me so thought I'd share.

Good luck all those who are quitting, you can do it! πŸ™‚

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(@gupta44)
Active Member
Joined: 7 years ago

I agree with Louie147 - at the end of the day you still have to have the willingness and the need to give it up.

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