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What makes people turn to spiritual healing?


smilodon14
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I just wondered what thoughts people have on what it takes for anyone suffering to turn to spiritual healing. I have been interested in healing since 1991, so when I was diagnosed with my current health issue, one of the first things I did post-op was to book myself in with a healer. So my mind was already there so to speak. Now, I know of others in a similar situation who have expressed no interest in healing, but will have for instance homoeopathy; stay within conventional medicine; or go to the fringes of conventional medicine, but conventional it still is ( ie no 'energy' therapy). And still, when you talk to doctor about healing, they have no idea what you are on about.

How big does the disruption in peoples lives have to be before they try this ?:confused:

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Reiki Pixie
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Hi S14

To be honest with you, I don't think our culture allows for belief in spiritual and energy therapies. Whether we are brainwashed by the church or by science or even both, why would anyone want to go to a healer? As for medical doctors, why should they believe, they have been indoctrinated through their education that the bio-medical model is the only way to go. In 5 years of basic medical training they typically only get 6 hours of nutritional education, so they will hardly take up alternatives.

Don't underestimate the power of negativity expressed in the media recently against all forms of complementary and alternative therapies.

Orginally all I wanted to be was an spiritual/energy healer, but either because I wasn't that good at it (prehaps?) or lacked confidence (more likely) I changed to massage and found suddenly I had a lot more clients and a lot more respect. Prehaps this is my true path.

Who knows the degree of physical, emotional, mental & spiritual discomfort people have to before they see their GP let alone a healer or therapist.

I've just grown to accept this situation, just get on with what I do, and treat who needs to be treated. But I do look forward to the day that healthcare integrates the best of the orthodox & complementary, and that healthcare professionals really do embrace the the holistic model of care, not pay lip service to it.

Best Wishes

RP

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smilodon14
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Thanx

Thanks for your reply RP:)

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beckyboop922
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Hello Smildon14

Welcome to HP. This is a question which was fascinated me for years, on the one hand I don't feel it should because we are conditioned very early on in our lives to give our power away and this often includes the belief that we cannot possibily take part in our own healing add that issue to the fact that we live in a society where looking at our emotions is far from encouraged and you are left with people who like RP says are brainwashed.
On the other hand it never fails to amaze me when people say such things as "I would do anything to feel better" like an acquaintance of mine recently posted on Facebook but when I offered her EFT (for free!) she said no because she was awaiting an appointment to see yet another specialist at the hospital and I see this all the time, experience also (as a counsellor and student of Transactional Analysis) that often people have an investment in remaining ill whether they are aware of it or not, this can include the person adopting the illness as part of their identity or a form of obtaining love, care and attention which they may not otherwise recieve.
All spiritual and alternative healing requires client participation and this in a nutshell is the problem, people want to be fixed always by others, most often those regarded as experts little knowing that in fact they are the expert on themselves and there is none greater.

Love

Rebecca xx

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Reiki Pixie
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Ah, that's something I forgotten to say, cheers Beckyboop for reminding me, that the first tenet of CAM is the client has responsibility for their health. To respond and have ability to help themselves.

RP

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Louloudog
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As a complete newbie and trying healing for the first time, to me it just felt right, although it went against so much of what I believed in then I tried it because there was a big urge that it was the right thing to do, and it was, every second was right. Xx

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Hallos
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Hello All,
Great Post and well said Beckyboop922. I have also offered treatments or suggested alternative therapies for clients/friends and also seen it turned down. As the saying goes you can lead a horse to water but you can’t make him drink. Every person is on their own journey and therefore it is not our place to force our suggestions onto them. I feel many healers find their spiritual path through perhaps becoming ill or a freinds becomes ill and they then try to find alternative solutions to heal them self or their friends.(if they are ready of course). Lots of light workers/healers have had tough journeys and have many sad stories to tell, but seem to find peace, compassion, empathy, gratitude and unconditional love along the way.
I am glad I have found my spiritual path it has changed me for the best i am truly grateful for who i am today 🙂

Much love and light,
Rachelx

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wavenergy
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It`s certainly illness that`s lead me to healing (giving and receiving) I`ve been going to Spiritualist churches (for healing mainly) on and off for 40yrs and often wondered if I might have any abilities in that dept but it`s taken 10+yrs of pain and suffering with ME/CFS and I suddenly discover I can heal. Maybe the pain etc was part of the neccesary journey?

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Crowan
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I don’t know if you’d consider shamanic healing as spiritual/energy healing (mostly I don’t but I know many do), but my experience has been that clients mainly fall into four categories – those who already ‘do’ shamanism and for whom it is the first port of call (or have an interest in shamanism and who often, then, take it up); those who are following a different spiritual path (often Spiritualism) who interpret what I am doing in their own way (which is fine so long as we avoid in-depth conversation about it); those who are desperate and have tried just about everything else and those who don’t believe but have been pressured by a friend or relative who does.

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wavenergy
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Types of customer

That makes a lot of sense 🙂

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Tashanie
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I just wondered what thoughts people have on what it takes for anyone suffering to turn to spiritual healing. I have been interested in healing since 1991, so when I was diagnosed with my current health issue, one of the first things I did post-op was to book myself in with a healer. So my mind was already there so to speak. Now, I know of others in a similar situation who have expressed no interest in healing, but will have for instance homoeopathy; stay within conventional medicine; or go to the fringes of conventional medicine, but conventional it still is ( ie no 'energy' therapy). And still, when you talk to doctor about healing, they have no idea what you are on about.

How big does the disruption in peoples lives have to be before they try this ?:confused:

I work as a volunteer therapist at a hospice. Many of the patients referred to me have never heard of reiki . So for may it will be a major health problem. BUT I see my skills as being complementary to and not instead of conventional therapy. So conventional treatment should always be the first option IMO

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Crowan
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I work as a volunteer therapist at a hospice. Many of the patients referred to me have never heard of reiki . So for may it will be a major health problem. BUT I see my skills as being complementary to and not instead of conventional therapy. So conventional treatment should always be the first option IMO


I know this is really what we are supposed to say but, judging from people’s comments about allopathic medicine (both on and off HP), I’m not sure that it is what most people think. I would always turn to shamanism first, before ‘conventional treatment’. If then my spirit helpers advised seeing a doctor (as they sometimes do) I would continue with both.

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Tashanie
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I know this is really what we are supposed to say but, judging from people’s comments about allopathic medicine (both on and off HP), I’m not sure that it is what most people think. I would always turn to shamanism first, before ‘conventional treatment’. If then my spirit helpers advised seeing a doctor (as they sometimes do) I would continue with both.

As a registered and still practising pharmacist I would be in trouble with the GPhC if I said anything other than that!! As a reiki practitioner or as a hypnotherapist I am not allowed to diagnose. And treating without a diagnosis could be risky. The codes of ethics of both the UKRF and the NCfH make it plain that I am expected to work alongside conventional medical practice.

Ethically I could not do anything else - and if I suspected a potential client had a serious underlying condition I would refuse to treat them until they had seen a doctor

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Crowan
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As a registered and still practising pharmacist I would be in trouble with the GPhC if I said anything other than that!! As a reiki practitioner or as a hypnotherapist I am not allowed to diagnose. And treating without a diagnosis could be risky. The codes of ethics of both the UKRF and the NCfH make it plain that I am expected to work alongside conventional medical practice.

Ethically I could not do anything else - and if I suspected a potential client had a serious underlying condition I would refuse to treat them until they had seen a doctor

Yes, I see that. Shamanism is quite different, however.

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Tashanie
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Yes, I see that. Shamanism is quite different, however.

Why?

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Crowan
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Why?


Because, although a client may come to me because s/he has, for example, cancer or continual bad luck or depression, shamanism is not attempting to cure those situations. We are dealing with the spiritual problem that has caused the situation. Once this is dealt with, it stops blocking the body’s/mind’s ability to heal. Therefore, the CSPC’s Code of Ethics has nothing to say about working with conventional medicine. Although we diagnose, we are not diagnosing anything that conventional medicine would recognise, nor claiming to cure anything that conventional medicine would recognise.

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TheMortalOne
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We are dealing with the spiritual problem that has caused the situation. Once this is dealt with, it stops blocking the body’s/mind’s ability to heal.

This is very true. Even psychotherapists recognize the importance of this. In my country at least. This is something conventional medicine does not really do. They treat symptoms. But what about the cause? If the cause is not cured. Then the problem will keep coming back. It's like with medication about depression. Taking a pill isn't really going to do anything, Unless you change the way you think. which determines your life.

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